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Life as a Wildlife Biologist: Remote Camp, Finding Ovaries + Checking Moose

When MDIFW Moose Biologist Lee Kantar was organizing the adaptive unit moose hunt, I offered to staff one of the registration stations placed around the western half of Wildlife Management District 4. While discussing this work with my Californian parents, my father, a science teacher, thought that sounded like too much fun– he found a substitute teacher for the week, received his COVID-19 booster shot, and booked a flight to Maine to volunteer with me.

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Giving Thanks for Maine’s Healthy Wild Turkey Population

There was once a time when the state of Maine lost its wild turkey population. In the 1800s before hunting was regulated, turkeys were hunted to extirpation and the future of wild turkeys looked grim for some time. Beginning in the late 1970s, reintroduction efforts to our state began to take after decades of unsuccessful attempts. With their challenging comeback in both Maine and the United States, there are several reasons to be grateful for our currently healthy and widespread wild turkey population.

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October’s Upland Adventures

I woke up three times before my alarm even went off, and it was set for well before the sun came up – I was as excited as a kid on Christmas morning. Today was the first day of upland bird hunting for me this year.

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Deer Management in Maine

The state of Maine is a vast region of forested landscapes and unique ecosystems supporting a rich diversity of wildlife and endless opportunities for outdoor recreation. In the last two years, Mainers have turned to the outdoors more than ever, seeking solace through fresh air and fresh food from the field.

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The Importance of Regulated Doe Harvest

While you can’t have a deer population without bucks, it is the does (female deer) carrying and raising offspring that drive population growth. Regulated doe harvest is a cornerstone of deer management and is the primary tool used by state deer managers to control or direct deer population growth.

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New Turkey Hunters Tell Their Spring Success Stories

The weather is hot and it feels like spring is far behind us. But the spring turkey hunt just wrapped up five days ago on June 5th. With an overall lift in outdoor recreation in Maine, we’re seeing more and more new hunters on the landscape. For many, this is just another opportunity to get outside and connect to nature, a key element to good mental health. New turkey hunters are seeing the benefits of spending time outside with friends and family, even if they don’t harvest a bird. A successful hunt doesn’t always end at a tagging station—but sometimes it does!

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Turkey Hunting: The Shot and Next Steps

The Department concluded a three-part spring turkey hunting panel discussion series on April 7, 2021. In the final episode of this series, three MDIFW staff members and avid turkey hunters retired Rec Safety Coordinator Reggie Read, Wildlife Special Projects Coordinator Bob Cordes, and current Rec Safety Coordinator Jasmine Pomerleau discussed the key features of the shot and after the shot.

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Turkey Hunting Gear

As part of a panel discussion series concluding April 7, 2021, the Department hosted a live panel discussion on March 31 with three MDIFW staff members and avid turkey hunters: Fisheries Resource Supervisor Liz Thorndike, retired Rec Safety Coordinator Reggie Read, and Wildlife Special Projects Coordinator Bob Cordes. This conversation focused on turkey hunting gear and calls.

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Understanding Spring Turkey Behavior + Scouting Tips

Spring turkey hunting is an excellent way to celebrate the end of winter. It’s a fun, interactive hunt, providing plenty of opportunity across the state. On March 24, the Department hosted a live panel discussion with three MDIFW staff members and avid turkey hunters: Turkey + Other Game Bird Biologist Kelsey Sullivan, Fisheries Resource Supervisor Liz Thorndike, and retired Rec Safety Coordinator Reggie Read.

Join Judy Outside: Opening Day

Over the past year, Covid 19 has changed almost every aspect of my life; from where and how I work, getting groceries, working out and most of all how often I get outside. I am an outdoor person, and I have always used the outdoors to help me manage stress and anxiety.