Hospital Pediatric Readiness

The care and management of a pediatric patient in the Emergency Department can be one of the most stressful events clinicians can face.  One way to help prepare to provide excellent care is to participate and evaluate your Emergency Department with the National Pediatric Readiness Assessment.  The Assessment is a key component of the National Pediatric Readiness Project, a nationwide collaborative effort to help provide resources and guidelines for hospital EDs to utilize with their unique needs, challenges, and resources for pediatric care.

The National Pediatric Readiness Project is a multi-phase quality improvement initiative to ensure that all U.S. emergency departments have the essential guidelines and resources in place to provide effective emergency care to children.


The NPRP assessment helps ED personnel to be better prepared to provide quality care for all patients of all ages.

About Pediatric Readiness q

  • Who participates in the National Pediatric Readiness Project?
  • Everyone! All emergency departments (ED) in the nation, including community-based hospitals, children's hospitals, military hospitals, and freestanding EDs are asked to participate in the National Pediatric Readiness Project.
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  • What is the National Pediatric Readiness Project?
  • The National Pediatric Readiness Project is a multi-phase quality improvement (QI) initiative to ensure that all U.S. emergency departments (EDs) have the essential guidelines and resources in place to provide effective emergency care to children.
  • National Pediatric Readiness Project White Paper (PDF) (2017) (Note - Maine did not have an EMS-C program in 2017)
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  • Who supports the National Pediatric Readiness Project?
  • The National Pediatric Readiness Project (NPRP) is a national quality improvement initiative co-led by the Health Resources Services Administration’s (HRSA) Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) Program, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Emergency Physicians, and the Emergency Nurses Association.
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  • Why is it important to participate?
  • The NPRP assessment helps ED personnel to become better prepared to provide quality care for all patients of all ages by evaluating the QI process of EDs over time. Hospitals with high ED readiness scores demonstrate a 4-fold lower rate of mortality for children with critical illness than those with lower readiness scores; thus improving pediatric readiness improves children and their families' outcomes.
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  • ENA Infographic on ED Readiness for Pediatrics (PDF)
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What is assessed? q

  • The assessment includes questions for hospital EDs around:

  •  - Infrastructure
  •  - Administration and coordination of care for children
  •  - Personnel
  •  - Pediatric-specific policies
  •  - Equipment
  •  - Resources
  • Although the survey period has ended, the 2021 Assessment can still be completed at the PedsReady website.  Simply select the state, county, and name of your hospital to begin the survey.  Hospitals can complete this survey as many times as desired based on changes and improvements in the hospital for an updated score.

    ED Managers who complete the NPRP assessment will receive an email summary report:

  • 1. A pediatric overall readiness score for their ED (range from 0 – 100)
  • 2. The average pediatric readiness score of EDs of similar pediatric volume
  • 3. The average pediatric readiness score of all participating EDs to use as a benchmark
  • 4.  Answers to their questions broken down into the six domains of readiness.
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What are the current results? q

What the heck is a PECC? q

  • Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator - generally speaking someone who acts as a champion for pediatric emergency care within a system or several systems.

    The Institute of Medicine report "Emergency Care for Children: Growing Pains" recommends EMS agencies and EDs appoint a PECC to provide pediatric leadership and while this individual need not be dedicated solely to this role they are an advocate for improved competencies and availability of resources for pediatric patients.

    In a study published in 2015, Gausche-Hill, et al., showed an association between the presence of a PECC and an increase in pediatric preparedness. The PECC can serve as a leader in the system or facility, a point of contact for updates on pediatric care, and liaison with other PECCs.

    The role of a PECC is flexible based on the resources and needs of the system(s). Some tasks may include promoting pediatric CEs, working with the Maine EMS for Children Program to collect data on pediatric care, and helping to ensure the availability of appropriate tools and equipment.

    For a more thorough list of possible tasks check out Sample Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator (PECC) role descriptions (PDF)

    The EMSC Innovation and Improvement Center has a variety of nationally-based resources for PECCs. They include access to free simulation equipment, scenarios, and a disaster triage game.

    The Massachusetts PECC toolkit has additional information, guidelines and great training videos on pediatric care.

    Have additional questions or would you like to act as your system's PECC?

       Contact us at Marc.A.Minkler@maine.gov

Readiness Checklist & Toolkit q

  • We freely share this comprehensive and dynamic set of resources coordinated by the Emergency Medical Services for Children Innovation and Improvement Center (EIIC) with the support and contribution of numerous national contributors. Both the checklist and toolkit are available as a free open-access resource intended for use by all providers (e.g. technicians, nurses, physicians, EMS providers, and ancillary staff) across the spectrum of pediatric emergency care to help facilitate the delivery of high-quality care to all children.

  • This checklist is based on the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), and Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) 2018 joint policy statement “Pediatric Readiness in the Emergency Department

  •  - Pediatric Readiness in the Emergency Department Checklist (PDF) (April 2021)

    The NPRP Toolkit content is organized by the seven domains of pediatric readiness: Administration and Coordination; Healthcare Provider Competencies; Quality Improvement; Policies and Procedures; Patient Safety; Support Services; and Equipment, Supplies, and Medications. The tools and resources will assist pediatric emergency care providers in better understanding and achieving the components of pediatric readiness in their emergency department.

     - NPRP Toolkit website

  • The NPRP has a number of resources related to ED readiness, QI in the ED, and other toolkits for use.  Visit the NPRP website for more information.

  • Improving ED Readiness to Care for Children - ENA (PDF) (December 2019)

  • Guidelines for Care for Children in the Emergency Department - Joint Policy Statement from ACEP, ENA & AAP (PDF) (October 2009)

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Recognition of YOUR hospital for Pediatric Readiness q

  • One of the goals of the EMS-C program is to recognize hospital Emergency Departments throughout Maine for their continued efforts to care for pediatric patients experiencing illness or injury.
  • Recognition programs are based upon the “Guidelines for Care for Children in the Emergency Department” a joint policy statement by the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Pediatric Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians Pediatric Committee, and the Emergency Nurses Association Pediatric Committee. These guidelines include criteria that address:
  •  - Administration and coordination of pediatric care
  •  - The qualifications of physicians, nurses, and other ED staff
  •  - A formal pediatric quality-improvement or monitoring program
  •  - Patient safety
  •  - Policies, procedures, and protocols
  •  - The availability of pediatric equipment, supplies, and medications
  • The Maine EMS-C program has developed standards and recognition for your efforts in improving pediatric readiness in the Emergency Department.  Recognition is voluntary and free and helps demonstrates your institution's commitment to being always ready for children.

  • Maine Always Ready for Children recognition program packet (PDF)

    Maine Always Ready for Children Commitment Letter (Word DOC)

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    Although the survey period has ended, the 2021 Assessment can be downloaded as a PDF for self-review/assessment.


    If you would like to become or know who your hospital Pediatric Emergency Care Coordinator is, please email the Maine EMS-C program.

North East Always Ready for Children Logo

Other Maine Pediatric Resources

  1. New England Behavioral Health Toolkit (link)
  2. Map of Hospitals in Maine by Maternal & Newborn Care Level (PDF) (2/2022)
  3. Child Abuse or Suspected Child Abuse in Maine
    1. Child Abuse Prevention Resources
    2. Mandatory Reporters in Maine & Education
    3. Mandatory Reporting Presentation 
  4. Maine State Infant Safe Haven Law (PDF)
  5. Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children during COVID (MIS-C)
    1. Youtube video of May 29, 2020 presentation from Massachusetts General Hospital for Children
    2. Maine Medical Center/Barbara Bush MIS-C Clinical Guidelines (PDF)

Resources for Families and Caregivers

State & Local Partners

Federal Partners

Reference Resources

Maine EMS makes no recommendations on any particular products or procedures.

Clinical Resources

Disaster Resources

If you would like a resource added, please email marc.a.minkler@maine.gov