Training

Safety Checkpoint in February

BHS van73rd RTT will be conducting an OUI checkpoint with the SPIDRE Team in the month of February in the greater Waterville area.

 Maine State Police K9 Dutch has received donation of body armor

Dutch VestMaine State Police K9 Dutch has received a bullet and stab protective vest thanks to a charitable donation from non-profit organization Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. The vest was sponsored by Madeline Hamersley of Sorrento, ME and embroidered with the sentiment “In memory of Detective Benjamin Campbell, EOW 4/3/19”.

Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c(3) charity located in East Taunton, MA whose mission is to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. The non-profit was established in 2009 to assist law enforcement agencies with this potentially lifesaving body armor for their four-legged K9 officers. Since its inception, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provided over 3,500 U.S. made, custom fitted, NIJ certified protective vests in 50 states, through private and corporate donations, at a value of $6.9 million dollars. 

The program is open to dogs actively employed in the U.S. with law enforcement or related agencies who are certified and at least 20 months of age. New K9 graduates, as well as K9s with expired vests, are eligible to participate.

The donation to provide one protective vest for a law enforcement K9 is $950.00. Each vest has a value between $1,744 – $2,283, and a five-year warranty and an average weight of 4-5 lbs. There is an estimated 30,000 law enforcement K9s throughout the United States. For more information or to learn about volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provides information, lists events, and accepts tax-deductible donations of any denomination at www.vik9s.org or mailed to P.O. Box 9 East Taunton, MA 02718. 
 

Maine State Police K9 Keet to get donation of body armor

Keet
Tpr. Adam Gould with K9 Partner Keet

Maine State Police K9 Keet will receive a bullet and stab protective vest thanks to a charitable donation from non-profit organization Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. K9 Keet’s vest is sponsored by a fundraiser hosted by Heather McKibben of HeatherFest, Norton, MA and will be embroidered with the sentiment “Gifted by HeatherFest in memory of Jerri, Drew & Cluck”. Delivery is expected within eight to ten weeks.

Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c (3) charity located in East Taunton, MA whose mission is to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. The non-profit was established in 2009 to assist law enforcement agencies with this potentially lifesaving body armor for their four-legged K9 officers. Since its inception, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provided over 3,500 U.S. made, custom fitted, NIJ certified protective vests, in 50 states, through private and corporate donations, at a value of $6.9 million dollars. 

The program is open to dogs actively employed in the U.S. with law enforcement or related agencies who are certified and at least 20 months of age. New K9 graduates, as well as K9s with expired vests, are eligible to participate.

The donation to provide one protective vest for a law enforcement K9 is $950.00. Each vest has a value between $1,744 – $2,283 and a five-year warranty, and an average weight of 4-5 lbs. There is an estimated 30,000 law enforcement K9s throughout the United States. For more information or to learn about volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provides information, lists events, and accepts tax-deductible donations of any denomination at www.vik9s.org or mailed to P.O. Box 9 East Taunton, MA 02718. 
 

Maine State Police K9 Dallas to get donation of body armor

Dallas
Tpr. Hunter Belanger and K9 Partner Dallas

Maine State Police K9 Dallas will receive a bullet and stab protective vest thanks to a charitable donation from non-profit organization Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. K9 Dallas’ vest is sponsored by a fundraiser hosted by the Waterville Elks Lodge #905 BPOE and will be embroidered with the sentiment “Gifted by Waterville Elks Lodge #905 BPOE”. Delivery is expected within eight to ten weeks.

Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c (3) charity located in East Taunton, MA whose mission is to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. The non-profit was established in 2009 to assist law enforcement agencies with this potentially lifesaving body armor for their four-legged K9 officers. Since its inception, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provided over 3,500 U.S. made, custom fitted, NIJ certified protective vests, in 50 states, through private and corporate donations, at a value of $6.9 million dollars. 

The program is open to dogs actively employed in the U.S. with law enforcement or related agencies who are certified and at least 20 months of age. New K9 graduates, as well as K9s with expired vests, are eligible to participate.

The donation to provide one protective vest for a law enforcement K9 is $950.00. Each vest has a value between $1,744 – $2,283 and a five-year warranty, and an average weight of 4-5 lbs. There is an estimated 30,000 law enforcement K9s throughout the United States. For more information or to learn about volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978. Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provides information, lists events, and accepts tax-deductible donations of any denomination at www.vik9s.org or mailed to P.O. Box 9 East Taunton, MA 02718.
 

Drug Recognition Experts Awarded

DRE Awards
From left: Tom Reagan, Law Enforcement Liaison for the Bureau of Highway Safety; Jamie Dionne, Highway Safety Coordinator for the Bureau of Highway Safety; Trooper-Specialist Seth Allen (DRE of the Year for 2018 and the year's top producer); Waterville Police Officer Ryan Dinsmore, (2018 top producer); retired Rockland Sgt. Don Finnegan, (Lifetime Achievement Award); Jim Lyman, State Impaired Driving Coordinator for the Maine Criminal Justice Academy; and Pat Moody from AAA Northern New England.

The Maine Bureau of Highway Safety and the Maine Criminal Justice Academy recently recognized several Drug Recognition Experts (DRE) for their continued work in removing impaired drivers from the streets of Maine.  A drug recognition expert is a law enforcement officer that is specially trained to recognize impairment in drivers under the influence of drugs other than, or in addition to, alcohol.  Drug Recognition Evaluations are performed by DREs when a person shows signs of significant impairment, but a breath alcohol test indicates low or no alcohol in a person’s system.  DREs can identify various types of impairment and determine which substances are causing the impairment as well as testifying to that effect in court.  These highly trained DREs are an integral part to ensuring that those who are driving while impaired are removed from the streets. 

As part of an annual recognition program, the Maine Bureau of Highway Safety recognized the Maine DRE of the Year, as well as two DRE Lifetime Achievement Awards.  In addition, AAA of Northern New England provided awards to recognize those DREs who conducted more than 10 DRE evaluations over the course of 2018. 

Maine State Police Specialist Seth Allen was awarded “DRE of the Year” for 2018 for conducting the most DRE evaluations in 2018 (32) and his overall contributions to the program.  Specialist Allen started with the Maine State Police in 2012 and attended the DRE school in 2015.  In 2018, Allen surpassed the 100 DRE enforcement evaluation milestone.  He has multiple Instructor certifications in impaired driving enforcement and completed the DRE instructor school in 2018.  Although he has had a fairly brief career as a DRE, Allen has accomplished much.  After completing the DRE Course Managers training in 2018, he was chosen to fill the role as Course Coordinator for the 2019 DRE school.  Allen has been crucial in supporting our new DRE students by assisting with or coordinating certification training events in Maine, Maryland, and Arizona. 

In 2018, Allen was promoted to Specialist with the Maine State Police assigned to the Traffic Division, specifically Impaired Driving.  He is the liaison with the Maine Bureau of Highway Safety and continues to teach drug impaired driver training statewide.  He manages several special enforcement teams that target impaired drivers and responds to call outs for drug evaluations.  Allen is always available to assist with a project and volunteers his time graciously.

Two lifetime achievement awards were issued to Robert Libby of the South Portland Police Department and Sgt. Edwin Don Finnegan (retired) of the Rockland Police Department.

Libby began working for the South Portland Police Department in 1990 and attended the DRE school in 1996.  He has multiple instructor certifications in impaired driving enforcement, including DRE Instructor, Standardized Field Sobriety Training Instructor, and Breath Testing Device Instructor.  Libby has been involved in some capacity in every DRE school since becoming an instructor in 1999 and has played a crucial role in supporting new DREs and coordination certification in training events in Cumberland County.

Finnegan started with the Rockland Police Department in 1992 and attended the DRE school in 1999. He completed the requirements for DRE Instructor in 2002 and has completed over 200 DRE enforcement evaluations to date. Finnegan has multiple Instructor certifications in impaired driving enforcement, including, DRE Instructor, Standardized Field Sobriety Training Instructor and Breath Testing Device Instructor.  Finnegan has been a crucial part of the development of the Drug Impaired Driving Programs in Maine over the years and now is co-managing the programs at MCJA.  He has been a lead instructor in most of our DRE and DRE instructor schools including an assignment as DRE Course Coordinator.  Finnegan has represented Maine at the National DRE Conference, State Coordinators meeting on several occasions. He plays a vital role in supporting new DREs and statewide training initiatives and is creating new ways to improve the Drug Evaluation and Classification programs, so they are sustainable for the future.

Officer Ryan Dinsmore serves with the Waterville Police Department and was recently recognized by the Maine Criminal Justice Academy (MCJA) for outstanding work in the Drug Recognition Expert (DRE) program for the year 2018.  Officer Dinsmore is one of more than 100 Drug Recognition Experts statewide and was recognized as one of the two top producers for drug impaired driving evaluations during 2018.  MCJA Impaired Driving Program Manager Jim Lyman made the presentation during the annual DRE training day held at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy on 8-29-2019.  Also present for the recognition was Jamie Dionne, Impaired Driving Coordinator for the Maine Bureau of Highway Safety.  

Officer Dinsmore is a 2018 graduate of the DRE School.  In recognition of his efforts and his commitment to the DRE program, he will be offered an opportunity to represent Maine at the International Association of Chiefs of Police Annual Training Conference on Drugs, Alcohol and Impaired Driving Conference in 2020, in San Antonio, Texas. 

Maloon Booth
Troopers Tyler Maloon and Garrett Booth

Top Producers for Drug Recognition Experts in 2018

Benjamin Boutilier, Aroostook County Sheriff’s Office, 12 evaluations;
Judson Cake, Bar Harbor Police Department, 12 evaluations;
Nathan Desrosiers, Maine State Police, 12 evaluations;
Rachel Horning, Westbrook Police Department, 12 evaluations;
Garrett Olsen, Bath Police Department, 12 evaluations;
Kevin Sager, South Portland Police Department, 12 evaluations;
Zachary Carey, Kennebec County Sheriff’s Office, 15 evaluations;
Dennis Lowe, Westbrook Police Department, 15 evaluations;
Garrett Booth, Maine State Police, 16 evaluations;
Michael Hinkley, Gorham Police Department, 16 evaluations;
Tyler Maloon, Maine State Police,  16 evaluations;
Ryan Dinsmore, Waterville Police Department, 18 evaluations;
Seth Allen, Maine State Police, 32 evaluations.


 

38 Junior Troopers participate in Junior Trooper Academy

Drill
Cadets drill on the parade deck at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy in Vassalboro (Photo Katharine England)

Recently, 38 students from across the state of Maine spent three days and two nights at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy in Vassalboro to get a taste for the challenges and opportunities that await them with a career in law enforcement.

The cadets stayed in billets (32 males on one floor, and six females on another), the same housing that potential Troopers and Officers use during the 18-week Basic Law Enforcement Training Program, and 10-week Recruit Training Troop (the additional, specialized training Maine State Troopers undergo after the BLETP). While there, the students spent time in the classroom and the grounds of the Academy getting a sense of the training and skill sets needed to become a Law Enforcement Officers.  Instructors were hand-selected by Corporal Breanne Petrini from agencies across the state and specialties within the Maine State Police.

K9 Demo
Cadets observe a demonstration by Trooper Shawn Porter and K-9 Myca. (Photo by Katharine England)

On the first day, after storing their gear, the cadets were greeted by Lt. David Trip, the commandant of the Maine Criminal Justice Academy and Commander of the specialty units of the Maine State Police. He explained to the cadets that the Junior Trooper Academy is a chance for the students to take control of their futures.
“This is a huge opportunity for you. When it comes to Junior Troopers and those [who take advantage of the] Internship Program during college, these folks often have a high percentage of getting hired as Troopers,” said Lt. Tripp. “Becoming a Trooper involves living your like life you want to be a Trooper and embodying our core values of Integrity, Fairness, Compassion, and Excellence.”

ERT
Detective Lauren Edstrom explains her duties and responsibilities to the cadets. (Photo by Katharine England)

He explained that this involves integrating the lessons from the three-day academy into their everyday lives, not falling into poor decision-making or peer pressure. The choices that these teens make will have an impact on their success in the not-too-distance future, something that recruiters will look at during the hiring process.
 “[At the JTA] We give you all the information you need to be successful – what did you do with it? Did you utilize it or did you cast it aside?” he asked. “When I say that you are Maine’s tomorrow, you truly are. I hope you embrace that and that we see you back here.”

Cadets learned about the history of the Maine State Police, had classes on ethical decision making, social media and law enforcement, motor vehicle high-risk stops, K9 demonstrations, criminal intelligence, and crime scene investigation. Each day there was also Physical Training, defensive tactics, and drill and ceremony.
A large amount of planning goes into the JTA and Cpl. Petrini starts the planning process six months before cadets arrive, juggling schedules of instructors and making sure things move smoothly for cadets and staff. She says that there is a big change in the cadets from the start of the JTA compared to the last day.

Inside

“There’s a huge change in confidence, bearing and just how they carry themselves. There’s a sense of pride. They’ve challenged themselves in ways they’ve never been challenged,” she said. “Every single one of them was here because they wanted to be here and they were eager to learn. This group 100-percent wanted to be here to learn more.”

The three-day Academy culminated with a showcase of specialties for the Maine State Police where Troopers from the Evidence Recovery Team, Bomb Team, Tactical Team, Underwater Recovery Team, Crisis Negotiation Team, Incident Management Team, Crash Reconstruction Unit were on hand to tell the cadets and their families about their jobs and offer demonstrations.

“It was awesome. Very intense,” said Isaac Plante, who had recently graduated from Sanford High School and planned on pursuing a career as a Maine State Trooper. “I was looking for [the JTA] to get me ready. … The coolest part was on the last day – looking around at the different aspects of [The Maine State Police] and the Tactical Team. It’s something I can see myself doing in the future, once I become a Trooper.”

Then the cadets and families headed inside for graduation ceremonies, displaying drill ceremonies they had learned over the course of the Academy. After all had been called to receive their certificates, there were smiles and handshakes and hugs and 38 cadets would go back to their parts of the state, all further down the path to their life goals.
 

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