Personal Services

COVID19 Prevention Checklist Industry Guidance

Last updated: Apr 30, 2021

The State of Maine has adopted a multi-layered approach to COVID-19 guidance—supported by science, public health expertise, and industry collaboration—to help Maine businesses and community organizations operate safely. As we enter the second year of the pandemic, these updated guidelines highlight the importance of employing multi-layered mitigation strategies to keep Maine businesses, employees, and residents as safe as possible from COVID-19 transmission. Public health guidance will continue to evolve as we learn which mitigation strategies most effectively reduce transmission risk.

No single measure or action will completely prevent transmission of COVID-19. Use of multiple strategies—sometimes called layered mitigation—provides greater protection than implementing a single strategy alone. When multiple mitigation strategies—including masking, physical distancing, hand hygiene, and ventilation—are consistently and correctly used, risk of transmission is decreased.

Please pair this Personal Services guidance with the general guidance available at https://www.maine.gov/decd/covid-19-prevention-checklists

For the latest information on travel policies and Executive Orders related to COVID-19 visit the Office of the Governor’s COVID-19 Response website: https://www.maine.gov/covid19.

Personal Services

General Guidance

  1. Require all staff, vendors, and clients to maintain 6 feet of physical distance from individuals who are not part of their household group whenever possible.
  2. Require all staff, vendors, and clients to wear a mask, per CDC recommendations and pertinent Executive Orders from the Office of the Governor. Masks are required indoors and recommended outdoors when 6 feet of physical distance is difficult to maintain. (Updated 4/30/21)
    1. Information about proper use of masks is available from the CDC (see: Use Masks to Slow the Spread of COVID-19).
  3. The number of individuals that can gather in a shared space must not exceed the limit established by the Governor’s Executive Order. All indoor gatherings are subject to the following limits: 
    1. Effective March 26, 2021 through May 23, 2021: 50% of permitted occupancy or 50 persons, whichever is greater.
    2. Effective May 24, 2021 and thereafter: 75% of permitted occupancy or 50 persons, whichever is greater.
    3. People in a shared space must be able to maintain 6 feet of physical distance. If a space cannot accommodate individuals maintaining 6 feet of physical distance, further restrict the number of individuals allowed in that space beyond the limits established by Executive Order.

Cleaning and Disinfection

  1. Refer to the following documents for guidance on general cleaning and disinfection:
    1. COVID-19 Prevention Checklist General Guidance (State of Maine)
    2. Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility (CDC)
    3. Cleaning and Disinfecting: Best Practices During the COVID-19 Pandemic (EPA)

Staff

  1. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19. For the most up to date information on this topic, see US CDC guidance on conditions that place individuals at increased risk of severe illness (see: People with Certain Medical Conditions).
  2. Workers should stay at home if they are sick. Supervisors should ask all workers to self-screen for COVID-19 symptoms using either of the following approaches:
    1. Use an electronic or app-based self-screening form, such as the Coronavirus Self-Checker available from the federal CDC.
    2. Self-screen using the following questions:
      1. Do you feel ill or are you caring for someone who is ill?
      2. In the past two weeks, have you been exposed to anyone who tested positive for COVID-19?
  3. Require employees to practice good hand hygiene with frequent handwashing, especially after contact with visitors and high-touch surfaces.
  4. Conduct business by phone or internet to the greatest extent practicable.
  5. Limit in-person gatherings or meetings of employees to the greatest extent practicable.
  6. Discourage employees from using colleagues’ phones, desks, workstations, radios, handhelds/wearables, or other office tools and equipment.
  7. Where possible, stagger employee shifts and meal breaks to avoid crowding.
  8. During activities when individuals need to remove their mask (i.e., when eating and drinking), they must remain physically distant from others. Adjust seating in break rooms and other common areas to promote physical distancing practices.
  9. Permit employees to take breaks and lunch outside, or in such other areas where physical distancing is attainable.
  10. Make sure you have a safe process to receive supplies and other deliveries.
  11. Request that vendors accessing the premises direct their employees to follow all physical distancing guidelines and health directives issued by the applicable public authorities.
  12. Adjust training/onboarding practices to limit number of people involved and allow for 6 foot spacing; use virtual/video/audio training when possible.
  13. Provide employees training on:
    1. hand hygiene
    2. physical distancing guidelines and expectations
    3. monitoring personal health
    4. proper wear, removal, and disposal of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
    5. laundering of cloth masks and uniforms:  Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility, How to Disinfect: Laundry (CDC)
    6. cleaning protocols, including how to safely and effectively use cleaning supplies:  Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools and Homes (CDC)
  14. Consider employee training in safe de-escalation techniques.

General Building and Operational Considerations

  1. Ensure adequate supplies (e.g., soap, paper towels, hand sanitizer, tissue) to support healthy hygiene practices, including increased cleaning and disinfection procedures.
  2. Take steps to improve ventilation in the building.
    1. Increase the percentage of outdoor air (e.g., using economizer modes of HVAC operations) potentially as high as 100% (first verify compatibility with HVAC system capabilities for both temperature and humidity control as well as compatibility with outdoor/indoor air quality considerations).
    2. Increase total airflow supply to occupied spaces, if possible.
    3. Disable demand-control ventilation (DCV) controls that reduce air supply based on temperature or occupancy.
    4. Consider using natural ventilation (i.e., opening windows if possible and safe to do so) when environmental conditions and building requirements allow.
  3. Take steps to ensure that all water systems and features (for example, drinking fountains) are safe to use after a prolonged facility shutdown to minimize the risk of Legionnaires’ disease and other diseases associated with water.
  4. Consider seeing clients by appointment only.
  5. Limit face-to-face contact with clients to the extent possible.
  6. Schedule appointments with adequate time in between appointments to reduce the number of clients in the establishment at a single time and allow for cleaning.
  7. Stagger arrivals and departures to the extent practicable.
  8. Inform patrons of your COVID-19 policies and procedures in advance.
  9. Place signage at entrances and throughout buildings (particularly high traffic areas such as service counters) alerting staff and visitors (including unaccompanied minors) to required occupancy limits, physical distancing requirements, and mask policies.
  10. It is recommended that establishments remind individuals that they should not visit the establishment if they are ill (e.g. have a fever or cough). Signage reminding individuals of the signs and symptoms of COVID-19 is highly recommended.
  11. Establishments must ask clients to self-screen for COVID-19 symptoms when they set up the appointment and again before they enter the establishment using either of the following approaches:
    1. Use an electronic or app-based self-screening form, such as the Coronavirus Self-Checker available on the US CDC’s website (see: Coronavirus Self-Checker).
    2. Self-screen using the following questions:
      1. Do you feel ill or have you been caring for someone who is ill?
      2. In the past two weeks, have you been exposed to anyone who tested positive for COVID-19?
  12. Consider installing non-porous physical barriers such as partitions or Plexiglas barriers to protect patrons and staff. Barriers should be placed at service counters and other similar locations where it is not possible to maintain a minimum of 6 feet of physical distance.
  13. Limit activities that require staff and/or visitors to enter within 6 feet of another person, regardless of whether physical barriers are installed.
  14. Modify building traffic flow to minimize contact between staff and patrons. Use floor decals and/or signage to establish travel patterns.
    1. Consider one-way entrances and exits, if possible.
    2. Consider establishing one-way travel patterns through the building.
    3. Ensure that physical distancing is maintained in elevators and stairwells. Consider limiting the number of individuals in an elevator at one time and designating one directional stairwells.
  15. Consider restricting the use of water fountains to refill only with instruction for visitors to wash or sanitize hands after use.
  16. For contact tracing purposes, to the extent practicable, establishments should maintain a record of information about visitors, including one customer's name and contact information per party, the date they were in the establishment, and the staff who had direct, prolonged interaction with them. Establishments must maintain records for at least 21 days. 
    1. Based on current scientific knowledge, a close contact is someone who was within 6 feet of an infected person for a total of 15 minutes or more starting from 48 hours before illness onset until the time the patient is isolated. An individual is also considered a close contact if they provided care at home to someone who is sick with COVID-19, had direct physical contact with the person (hugged or kissed them), shared eating or drinking utensils, or if the person sneezed, coughed, or somehow got respiratory droplets on them.
  17. Establishments should promptly notify the Maine DHHS, CDC or any local health official if a they learn an employee or other worker has tested positive for COVID-19 and assist all such officials as reasonably requested to trace likely contacts and advise contacts to isolate and self-quarantine.
  18. Any retail spaces should follow state guidance on safe operation of retail businesses.
  19. Any establishment with food or drink service should follow state guidance on food and drink service.

Restrooms and Locker Rooms

  1. Use of locker rooms should be restricted to allow for adequate physical distancing and regular cleaning. Showers may be used as long as occupancy is limited to maintain physical distancing in common areas.
  2. Limit restroom occupancy for group restrooms to incorporate physical distancing and avoid formation of waiting lines outside of restrooms.
  3. Clean and disinfect restrooms on a regular and scheduled basis (see General Cleaning and Disinfecting section).
  4. Post handwashing signs in all restrooms.

Transactions

  1. Limit cash and paper receipt transactions; Promote “contactless” payment options (e.g., online payments, pay by phone options, RFID credit and debit cards, Apple Pay, Google Pay, etc.)
  2. Wash hands or use alcohol-based hand sanitizer (at least 60% alcohol) after handling cash.
  3. Where possible, card readers should be placed in front of physical barriers so visitors can swipe their own cards and enter their codes.
  4. Card readers and keypads should be cleaned and disinfected regularly.
  5. Hand sanitizer should be made available for staff and patrons before and after transactions.

Barbering and Cosmetology - Hair

All existing safety, sanitation and infection control standards established by the Barbering and Cosmetology Licensing Program are still in effect and enforced. Reference, Program Rule Chapters 20 and 26, which is available at https://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/rules/02/chaps02.htm#041

Personal Protective Gear, Supplies, and Clothing (all practitioners)

  1. Wear well-fitting masks
    1. Establishment employees, including practicing owners must wear masks at all times.
    2. Provide workers with up-to-date COVID information and training on safe donning, doffing, and disposal of personal protective equipment such as gloves and masks.
  2. Client masks
    1. Discourage, or remove from service offerings, any services on the face that would require clients to remove their mask. If such services are offered, advise clients that removal of masks increases the risk of transmission of COVID-19 and confirm with the client that they consent to such services.
    2. All procedures requiring a customer to remove their mask must be performed by a single attendant wearing a well-fitting mask that completely covers the nose and mouth. 
    3. Time-limited procedures of less than 15 minutes in length (e.g. beard trimming, limited facial waxing, piercing, etc.) can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs for the time necessary to complete the procedure on the parts of the face covered by the mask. For example, if upper lip waxing is to occur, the mask may be removed only for the portion of the service that involves the upper lip and must remain on for the other portions.
    4. Extended-time procedures (e.g. services that take more than just a few minutes to perform such as facials, make-up services, facial tattooing, electrolysis, etc.) increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission. They can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs during the active time of the service. Customers must wear masks inside the establishment until the service begins and must replace them immediately after the procedure is finished. These procedures must be performed in a completely separate room with doors closed and are limited to one attendant and one customer per room. Appropriate cleaning, disinfection, and air exchange inside the space needs to occur between customers. Schedule adequate time between customer appointments for cleaning and air exchange.
  3. Capes
    1. Drape each client with a clean cape.
    2. Launder capes between each client or consider using disposable capes and dispose of the cape after it is used.
  4. In accordance with Barbering and Cosmetology Program Rule Chapter 26, all tools, implements and equipment must be cleaned and sanitized in accordance with required standards.

Cleaning and Disinfection

  1. Change disinfectants used for immersion daily or sooner if it becomes contaminated (ex: hair/debris floating in solution or cloudy solution.)
  2. Disinfectant only works on a clean surface, so clean all surfaces and tools with hot soapy water, Ship-shape or cleaning wipes (if using wipes, be sure to cover surface thoroughly) before disinfecting.
    1. Contact time refers to how long the disinfectant is visibly wet on the surface allowing it to destroy the pathogens. Typical contact time for immersion/sprays is 10 minutes, for disinfectant wipes is 2-4 minutes. Observe contact time on label to allow disinfectant to work properly. Disinfection is for hard non-porous surfaces, glass metal and plastic.
  3. Porous/soft surfaces cannot be disinfected and must only be used once and then discarded (tools such as cardboard files, buffers, drill bits etc.)
  4. Provide Barbicide® or EPA disinfectant wipes, liquid disinfectant containers, and Barbicide® concentrate/or EPA approved disinfectant for disinfecting technical implements and work areas.

Work Areas

  1. Shampoo Bowls
    1. Clean and disinfect high touch areas.
    2. Limit as much as possible face-to-face contact with clients. Face shields or other eye protection should be worn throughout entire duration of the hair wash service.
  2. Work Stations
    1. Clean all work area surfaces and high touch items between clients.
    2. Clean and disinfect all appliances, sheers, clippers, clipper guards, clippies, rollers, combs, brushes, rolling carts and any other items used in connection with servicing clients.
    3. Provide hand sanitizer at all work locations for employees and clients.
    4. Consider station barriers between workstations.

Barbering and Cosmetology - Nails

All existing safety, sanitation and infection control standards established by the Barbering and Cosmetology Licensing Program are still in effect and enforced. Reference, Program Rule Chapters 20 and 26, which is available at https://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/rules/02/chaps02.htm#041.

Personal Protective Gear, Supplies, and Clothing

  1. Wear well-fitting masks
    1. Establishment employees, including practicing owners must wear masks at all times.
    2. Provide workers with up-to-date COVID information and training on safe donning, doffing, and disposal of personal protective equipment such as gloves and masks.
    3. Clients must wear masks while in the establishment.

Cleaning and Disinfection

In accordance with Barbering and Cosmetology Program Rule Chapter 26, all tools, implements and equipment must be cleaned and sanitized in accordance with required standards.

  1. Change disinfectants used for immersion daily or sooner if it becomes contaminated (ex: hair/debris floating in solution or cloudy solution.)
  2. Disinfectant only works on a clean surface so clean all surfaces and tools with hot soapy water, Ship-shape or cleaning wipes (if using wipes, be sure to cover surface thoroughly) before disinfecting.
    1. Contact time refers to how long the disinfectant is visibly wet on the surface allowing it to destroy the pathogens. Typical contact time for immersion/sprays is 10 minutes, for disinfectant wipes is 2-4 minutes. Observe contact time on label to allow disinfectant to work properly. Disinfection is for hard non-porous surfaces, glass metal and plastic.
  3. Porous/soft surfaces cannot be disinfected and must only be used once and then discarded (tools such as cardboard files, buffers, drill bits etc.)
  4. Provide Barbicide® or EPA disinfectant wipes, liquid disinfectant containers, and Barbicide® concentrate/or EPA approved disinfectant for disinfecting technical implements and work areas.

Work Areas

  1. Work Stations
    1. Clean all work area surfaces and high touch items between clients.
    2. Clean and disinfect all reusable tools, implements and items between clients.
    3. Provide hand sanitizer at all work locations for employees and clients.
    4. Consider station barriers between workstations.
  2. Nail Services
    1. Manicuring tables must be disinfected prior to each new client.
    2. Cover the table with a clean towel or plastic disposable covering between each client.
    3. Each new nail service requires replacement with new or clean articles for each client, including, cloth towels, finger bowls, spatulas and any other tool or implement that comes into direct contact of the nail or skin or skin product from multi-use containers.
    4. For cleaning standards of Foot Spas, Foot Basins and Spa Liners, refer to Barbering and Cosmetology Program Rules Chapter 26, section 26.270 – 26.282.

Tanning Services

Personal Protective Gear, Supplies, and Clothing

  1. Well-fitting masks
    1. Establishment employees must well-fitting masks at all times.
    2. Require clients to wear masks at all times. Consider providing masks to clients. Clients receiving services during which a mask may not be worn should wear a mask before and after they receive the service, as well as during as much of the service as possible.

Cleaning and Disinfection

  1. Disinfectant only works on a clean surface so clean all surfaces and tools with hot soapy water, Ship-shape or cleaning wipes (if using wipes, be sure to cover surface thoroughly) before disinfecting.
    1. Contact time refers to how long the disinfectant is visibly wet on the surface allowing it to destroy the pathogens. Typical contact time for immersion/sprays is 10 minutes, for disinfectant wipes is 2-4 minutes. Observe contact time on label to allow disinfectant to work properly. Disinfection is for hard non-porous surfaces, glass metal and plastic.

Work Areas

  1. In tanning areas, clean tanning beds and booths, spray booths, seating, door handles, and any other high-touch surfaces after each use.
  2. If establishment provides tanning supplies (i.e., eye protection, hair caps, sandals/foot protectors, lip balm), use of disposable, single-use items is encouraged. If a reusable item can be disinfected, then disinfect appropriately (see Cleaning and Disinfection). Clients may use their own supplies, but all supplies must be appropriate for the service (e.g., eye goggles brought from home must be appropriate for indoor tanning).
  3. Provide hand sanitizer at all work locations for employees and clients.

Tattoo, Body Piercing, Electrolysis, and Micropigmentation Establishments

Employees must continue to follow all health, safety and cleaning rules set forth in Rules Relating to Tattooing 10-144 Chapter 210, and Rules Relating to Body Piercing 10-144 CMR 209.

Personal Protective Gear, Supplies, and Clothing

  1. Establishment employees, including practicing owners, must wear well-fitting masks at all times (as long as there is not a mask shortage situation for healthcare workers).
  2. Employees are advised to wear face shields or other eye protection in addition to masks when servicing clients. Choose a face shield that wraps around the sides of your face and extends below your chin or a hooded face shield. Choose eye protection that covers the front and side of your face; protective eyewear with gaps between the glasses and the face likely do not protect eyes from all splashes or sprays.
  3. Consider providing physical barriers to protect customers and staff such as partitions or plexiglass barriers.
  4. Employees should wear gloves as required by Rules Relating to Tattooing 10-144 Chapter 210, and Rules Relating to Body Piercing 10-144 CMR 209. When servicing clients, change gloves between each client, and wash hands thoroughly for 20 seconds between clients and glove changes.

Operations

  1. Client masks
    1. Discourage, or remove from service offerings, any services on the face that would require clients to remove their mask. If such services are offered, advise clients that removal of masks increases the risk of transmission of COVID-19 and confirm with the client that they consent to such services.
    2. All procedures requiring a customer to remove their mask must be performed by a single attendant wearing a well-fitting mask that completely covers the nose and mouth, as well as a face shield or other eye protection. Choose a face shield that wraps around the sides of your face and extends below your chin or a hooded face shield. Choose eye protection that covers the front and side of your face; protective eyewear with gaps between the glasses and the face likely do not protect eyes from all splashes or sprays. Employees who for medical reasons or otherwise cannot wear a mask and face shield or other eye protection cannot perform these services.
    3. Time-limited procedures of less than 15 minutes in length (e.g. beard trimming, limited facial waxing, piercing, etc.) can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs for the time necessary to complete the procedure on the parts of the face covered by the mask. For example, if upper lip waxing is to occur, the mask may be removed only for the portion of the service that involves the upper lip and must remain on for the other portions.
    4. Extended-time procedures (e.g. services that take more than just a few minutes to perform such as facials, make-up services, facial tattooing, electrolysis, etc.) increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission. They can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs during the active time of the service. Customers must wear masks inside the establishment until the service begins and must replace them immediately after the procedure is finished. These procedures must be performed in a completely separate room with doors closed and are limited to one attendant and one customer per room. Appropriate cleaning, disinfection, and air exchange inside the space needs to occur between customers. Schedule adequate time between customer appointments for cleaning and air exchange.

Spas and Close-Contact Personal Services

All existing safety, sanitation and infection control standards established by the Barbering and Cosmetology Licensing Program are still in effect and enforced. Reference, Program Rule Chapters 20 and 26, which is available at https://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/rules/02/chaps02.htm#041.

Personal Protective Gear, Supplies, and Clothing (all services)

  1. Masks
    1. Establishment employees must wear well-fitting masks at all times.
    2. Discourage, or remove from service offerings, any services on the face that would require clients to remove their mask. If such services are offered, advise clients that removal of masks increases the risk of transmission of COVID-19 and confirm with the client that they consent to such services.
    3. All procedures requiring a customer to remove their mask must be performed by a single attendant wearing a well-fitting mask that completely covers the nose and mouth.  If there is a possibility that employees will come into contact with bodily fluids, they should wear face shields or other eye protection in addition to masks when servicing clients. Choose a face shield that wraps around the sides of your face and extends below your chin or a hooded face shield. Choose eye protection that covers the front and side of your face; protective eyewear with gaps between the glasses and the face likely do not protect eyes from all splashes or sprays. Employees who for medical reasons or otherwise cannot wear a mask and face shield or other eye protection (if required due to contact with bodily fluids) cannot perform these services.
    4. Time-limited procedures of less than 15 minutes in length (e.g. beard trimming, limited facial waxing, piercing, etc.) can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs for the time necessary to complete the procedure on the parts of the face covered by the mask. For example, if upper lip waxing is to occur, the mask may be removed only for the portion of the service that involves the upper lip and must remain on for the other portions.
    5. Extended-time procedures (e.g. services that take more than just a few minutes to perform such as facials, make-up services, facial tattooing, electrolysis, etc.) increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission. They can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs during the active time of the service. Customers must wear masks inside the establishment until the service begins and must replace them immediately after the procedure is finished. These procedures must be performed in a completely separate room with doors closed and are limited to one attendant and one customer per room. Appropriate cleaning, disinfection, and air exchange inside the space needs to occur between customers. Schedule adequate time between customer appointments for cleaning and air exchange.
  2. Eye protection
    1. If there is a possibility that employees will come into contact with bodily fluids, they should wear face shields or other eye protection in addition to masks when servicing clients. Choose a face shield that wraps around the sides of your face and extends below your chin or a hooded face shield. Choose eye protection that covers the front and side of your face; protective eyewear with gaps between the glasses and the face likely do not protect eyes from all splashes or sprays.
  3. Gloves
    1. Use nitrile or vinyl, unpowdered gloves anytime the potential exists to come into contact with blood or body fluids including when a client has broken skin in an area where massage is provided or when the practitioner has broken skin on the hands or forearms.
    2. Gloves might be worn when handling potentially contaminated laundry but are not necessary so long as the practitioner practices correct hand hygiene.

Cleaning and Disinfection

  1. Disinfectant only works on a clean surface so clean all surfaces and tools with hot soapy water, Ship-shape or cleaning wipes (if using wipes, be sure to cover surface thoroughly) before disinfecting.
    1. Contact time refers to how long the disinfectant is visibly wet on the surface allowing it to destroy the pathogens. Typical contact time for immersion/sprays is 10 minutes, for disinfectant wipes is 2-4 minutes. Observe contact time on label to allow disinfectant to work properly. Disinfection is for hard non-porous surfaces, glass metal and plastic.

Work Areas

  1. Work Stations
    1. Between each client session, clean and disinfect work surfaces and high touch items.
    2. Clean and disinfect all reusable tools, implements, and items.
    3. Clean and disinfect all appliances used in connection with servicing clients between each client. 
    4. Provide hand sanitizer at all work locations for employees and clients. 
    5. Consider installing non-porous physical barriers such as partitions or plexiglass barriers between workstations, if applicable.

Aesthetic Services

Services must be performed in compliance with all practice safety, sanitation, disinfecting and infection control standards outlined in the Barbering and Cosmetology Program Rule Chapter 26.

  1. Between each client session, clean and disinfect work surfaces and high touch items.
  2. After each client, clean and disinfect tools and implements in accordance with Chapter 26.
  3. Applicators should not be left standing in the wax or be dipped into the wax after coming into direct contact with the client. Wax may not be reused on another client.

Massage

Personal Protective Gear, Supplies, and Clothing (all practitioners)

  1. Masks
    1. Establishment employees must wear well-fitting masks at all times.
    2. Discourage, or remove from service offerings, any services on the face that would require clients to remove their mask. If such services are offered, advise clients that removal of masks increases the risk of transmission of COVID-19 and confirm with the client that they consent to such services.
    3. All procedures requiring a customer to remove their mask must be performed by a single attendant wearing a well-fitting mask that completely covers the nose and mouth, as well as a face shield or other eye protection. Choose a face shield that wraps around the sides of your face and extends below your chin or a hooded face shield. Choose eye protection that covers the front and side of your face; protective eyewear with gaps between the glasses and the face likely do not protect eyes from all splashes or sprays. Employees who for medical reasons or otherwise cannot wear a mask and face shield or other eye protection cannot perform these services.
    4. Time-limited procedures of less than 15 minutes in length (e.g. beard trimming, limited facial waxing, piercing, etc.) can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs for the time necessary to complete the procedure on the parts of the face covered by the mask. For example, if upper lip waxing is to occur, the mask may be removed only for the portion of the service that involves the upper lip and must remain on for the other portions.
    5. Extended-time procedures (e.g. services that take more than just a few minutes to perform such as facials, make-up services, facial tattooing, electrolysis, etc.) increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission. They can be performed provided removal of the customer’s mask only occurs during the active time of the service. Customers must wear masks inside the establishment until the service begins and must replace them immediately after the procedure is finished. These procedures must be performed in a completely separate room with doors closed and are limited to one attendant and one customer per room. Appropriate cleaning, disinfection, and air exchange inside the space needs to occur between customers. Schedule adequate time between customer appointments for cleaning and air exchange.
  2. Eye protection
    1. If there is a possibility that employees will come into contact with bodily fluids, they should wear face shields or other eye protection in addition to masks when servicing clients. Choose a face shield that wraps around the sides of your face and extends below your chin or a hooded face shield. Choose eye protection that covers the front and side of your face; protective eyewear with gaps between the glasses and the face likely do not protect eyes from all splashes or sprays.
  3. Gloves
    1. Gloves might be worn when handling potentially contaminated laundry but are not necessary so long as the practitioner practices correct hand hygiene.
    2. Use nitrile or vinyl, unpowdered gloves anytime the potential exists to come into contact with blood or body fluids including when a client has broken skin in an area where massage is provided or when the practitioner has broken skin on the hands or forearms.

Work Areas

  1. Between each client sessions, clean and disinfect work surfaces and high touch items.
  2. Provide a clean face-rest cover for each client.
  3. Change drapes and linens between each client.
  4. Ventilate the session room between clients by opening doors and windows to circulate fresh air.

Session procedures

  1. Both the practitioner and client must wear a mask during the session.
  2. To minimize the dispersion of infected respiratory droplets, limit talking in the session room to communication about pressure, warmth, and comfort.
  3. Intra-oral or nasal massage should not be done at this time because of increased risk of exposure.
  4. Request that client sanitize their hands before they leave the session room and before they pass through common areas of the facility.

Onsite and Outcall Locations

  1. Onsite locations refer to anywhere massage is performed in a massage chair or on a portable massage table at locations where clients are not enclosed in a session room and remain clothed throughout the massage (e.g., an airport chair massage business). At onsite settings, massage practitioners are still subject to the same cleanliness and disinfection protocols as other massage business locations, to the proper management of linens, to pertinent client policies and procedures, and to practitioner hygiene requirements as described in this checklist.
  2. Outcall locations refer to mobile massage provided in a client’s home or hotel room. Massage practitioners should refer to the In-Home Services checklist if providing services at outcall locations.

Fitness Areas and Locker Rooms

  1. Refer to Gyms and Fitness Centers checklist

Pools

  1. Refer to Gyms and Fitness Centers checklist
  2. Hot tubs and hydrotherapy may be offered provided that clients are maintaining physical distancing at all times and using a mask. Masks should not be worn if doing so would interfere with the safe operation of the hot tub or hydrotherapy tub/pool, or present a concern if clients are or may be fully immersed in water. When a face covering becomes wet or soiled, it should be changed.
  3. Hot tubs and hydrotherapy tubs must be cleaned and disinfected frequently. Surfaces touched by clients above the water should be cleaned and disinfected between uses.

Saunas and Steam Rooms

  1. Saunas and steam rooms should remain closed at this time due to limited ventilation and fresh air exchange and the challenges associated with maintaining disinfected surfaces and physical distancing guidelines.

COVID-19 Prevention Form

In order to open, if you have not already done so, please commit to complying with requirements of these checklists by filling out this short online form. Please note that religious organizations and licensed health care providers are not required to use this form.

If you have questions, please contact us at business.answers@maine.gov or 1-800-872-3838.