mallards eating bread

Skip the bread. Just watch instead!

Malnutrition, disease, habitat degradation, and habituation are serious consequences of feeding ducks and geese.

rusty patched bumble bee

BEE on the Lookout for the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee

Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is looking for the federally Endangered Rusty Patched Bumble Bee and we need more eyes!

gray treefrog

Mapping Maine’s Salamanders, Frogs, Turtles, and Snakes

Maine’s wildlife biologists rely on community members to share their observations, including you!

beaver with kit

Happy Mother’s Day!

It only takes a quick look into the animal kingdom to see that motherhood comes in many forms.

New England cottontail release

New England Cottontails have returned to Scarborough Marsh Wildlife Management Area!

MDIFW’s restoration efforts for the New England cottontail rabbits (a State Endangered species) is a multi-faceted approach.

blue-spotted salamander

Why did the Amphibian Cross the Road?

The short answer is, to get to the vernal pool! Of course, there’s more to it than that, so here’s a bit more about vernal pools and why many amphibians are now on the move.

Great blue heron with a stick during nest building

Ring in the Spring with the Heron Observation Network – 13 Years and Counting

Of the many harbingers of spring, herons returning to their colonies is my favorite! Before we embark on the 14th year of heron colony monitoring, let's first review results from the 2021 volunteer efforts.

Great blue heron with GPS tag on back, standing in marsh.

Spring is Here, but Where are Our Tagged Herons?

Spring is here, and we are patiently waiting for our tagged herons to return from their wintering areas. Here's an update explaining why we haven't seen them yet.

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Beaver Flowage Attracts GPS-Tagged Heron to Nest

Have you heard of Cornelia, an adult female great blue heron tagged with a GPS transmitter, who nests in Maine and migrates to the Bahamas for the winter? She is one of ten other herons who’ve been equipped with GPS transmitters by Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW) to learn more about heron movements, habits, and habitats in Maine and beyond. The project began with the help of a Maine Outdoor Heritage Fund grant and many partnering schools, and is part of MDIFW’s ongoing efforts to understand the status of great blue herons in the state – especially along the coast where their population has declined by 89% since the 1980s.

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First Maine Island-Nesting Heron Tagged with GPS Transmitter

IFW technician Brittany Currier holds tagged great blue heron just before release. To ensure everyone’s safety, IFW biologist Amanda Cross holds onto the bill.