Governor LePage Calls on NFL Commissioner to Change Domestic Violence Policy

August 14, 2014

On Wednesday, August 12, Governor Paul R. LePage sent a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. In this week's radio message, Governor LePage highlighted that letter, which has since garnered national exposure. (See link to letter at the bottom of this page.)

This week's radio address:

The NFL has an Opportunity to Push Back Against Domestic Violence Domestic Violence does not discriminate. This crime affects thousands of people, no matter their age, race or economic background.

Hello. This is Governor Paul LePage.

Most domestic violence victims are women, but this is not just a women’s issue. Men must be part of the solution to end the pattern of abuse.

Recently, the National Football League has taken heat for how it sanctions players who commit a domestic violence crime.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell gave a mere two-week suspension to Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice. This man knocked his fiancée unconscious, then dragged her out of an elevator. Rice pled not guilty, but the video doesn’t lie. Sadly, his fiancée is now his wife. If a two-week suspension is the “punishment” for knocking a woman unconscious, then there is something very wrong with the NFL culture. This week in a letter to Goodell, I told him I’m appalled that he promotes permissive disciplinary procedures that could ultimately result in the death of innocent people.

NFL quarterback Michael Vick served 2 years in prison for running a dog-fighting ring, but an NFL player who commits a violent crime against a woman gets a two-week suspension. The NFL mandates harsher penalties for players who violate the league’s personal-conduct policy or abuse drugs than those who commit domestic violence. This defies common sense.

Taking thugs and wife beaters off the field may be bad for business, but the NFL is playing games with people’s lives.

I don’t know if Commissioner Goodell is familiar with domestic violence or if it has affected his family personally. However, I can tell you firsthand that domestic violence is about a perpetrator having power and control over another individual. Too many times, it leads to murder.

I have a zero-tolerance position on domestic violence. There is no excuse for this type of behavior in our society. Until all of us make an effort to end this abuse, the cycle will continue. NFL players are role models for young men, and many of them excel at that. But if some players are allowed to act violently toward women, then young men will think that behavior is acceptable. It tarnishes all players and gives the NFL a bad name.

This is not about winning or losing. This is about life or death. The NFL has an opportunity to change the rules. We urge Goodell to have the courage to do so.

Thank you for listening.

Related Documents

LETTER