Guidelines for Community Contracts

The following information is for contracts between the Maine CDC and community lead poisoning prevention partners. All of the information documented here is also available in both the Community Contract Guidelines and the Agreement to Purchase Services documents.

Reporting Requirements

Local Service Area contracts ($2,000/HMP) do not require any quarterly financial or narrative reports. You do, however, need to send an itemized invoice on letterhead or billing form for payment.

All other contracts require quarterly financial reports and quarterly narrative reports on the following schedule:

Reporting Period Date Due
07/01/13-09/30/13 11/01/13
10/01/13-12/31/13 02/01/14
01/01/14-03/31/14 05/01/14
04/01/14-06/30/14 08/15/14

For each reporting period, you need to file quarterly financial reports, quarterly narrative reports, and materials use forms.

Quarterly Financial Reports

Financial reports should be sent to the Agreement Administrator listed in Rider B #6 of the Agreement to Purchase Services (your contract) with a copy sent to Eric Frohmberg (eric.frohmberg@maine.gov).  Get the DHHS contact listing for staff which provides the CRM and SPOC assigned to each vendor that currently has a contract with DHHS. 

The correct forms for financial reports can be found as follows:

  1. Go to http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/contracts/index.html.
  2. Click on the left-hand-side link to the contract for the appropriate year located under the Information heading.
  3. Scroll down to “Quarterly Financial Report” and click on the Excel link.

Quarterly Narrative Reports and Materials Use Reports

Narrative reports should include a description of meeting the deliverables outlined below (you may cut and paste those parts that are relevant to your funding level). Additionally, narrative reports should include the LPPF Materials Use Report.

Requirements/Deliverables for the different funding levels (from the Community Contract guidelines) are identified in the sections below.

Requirements/Deliverables for individual LSA funding ($2,000/HMP)

  1. Identify a point-of-contact for lead poisoning prevention outreach who can work with LPPF staff to distribute lead poisoning prevention information utilizing the HMPs’ existing programs and networks.
  2. Help distribute (through existing channels) targeted marketing materials and training information developed by the Lead Poisoning Prevention Fund—for example, parents of young children, health care providers working with young families, housing service providers, and landlords.
  3. Participate in six (6) one-hour Maine CDC web-based trainings (webinars) over the course of the agreement period.  No travel is required.

Requirements/Deliverables for district-wide PHD funding ($6,500/District)

  1. Identify the lead agency (or agencies) and the process that will be used to coordinate planning and provide services across the district.
  2. Hold a minimum of three (3) education programs or outreach events that are developed using best-practice strategies identified as highly likely to produce intended results.  Report the number of people who attended each event and the specific audience(s) reached.
  3. Use health promotion and educational approaches to overcome key barriers and make use of opportunities within your community for enabling the public to identify lead hazards and take precautionary action to prevent exposure.  The HMP is encouraged to use a variety of approaches to encourage lead-smart practices, as well as to educate about lead poisoning prevention and lead-safe behaviors.  These approaches should include collaboration, communication, and education.  Targeted risk communication can take on any method that works locally to achieve desired results.
  4. Follow the LPPF evaluation plan, which allows you to track and report the outcomes of your outreach campaigns.  For example:
    • Number of community groups involved in outreach;
    • Number of materials distributed;
    • Number of outreach events completed;
    • Number of people attending events.

HMPs within these shared public health districts are encouraged to work together to develop and implement a district-wide model, with appropriate roles for each contributing program.

Requirements/Deliverables for High-Density Area funding

Targeted Community Funding

Approximately 40% of elevated blood lead levels in Maine children are found within five communities: Portland, Lewiston/Auburn, Bangor, Biddeford/Saco, and Sanford.  Within these communities, over 80% of elevated blood lead levels have been identified in rental housing.  The HMPs serving these communities may apply for up to $28,750 to work more intensely in these specific high-density communities, targeting lead hazard awareness and risk reduction education for landlords and tenant families.  The core funding of $22,500 is to implement a targeted outreach strategy for landlords and tenants.  To help engage local partners and add flexibility in programming, up to $2,500 can be awarded for inclusion of community-based organizations such as landlord associations, tenant organizing groups, and environmental education organizations.

Additional funds ($6,250) are available to offer (or to engage local partners in offering) free lead inspections (lead dust testing) for high-risk rental units.  To assist the Community Partners in reaching their targeted unit goal there are some changes in how the lead dust testing program can be structured and implemented.  See “HDA Lead Dust Testing Funds” below.

Minimum requirements/deliverables ($22,500)

  1. Focus activities in those areas already defined as highest risk for poisoning children.
  2. a) Maintain and promote a system for identifying and working with owners of rental properties within your target area.  This system will include educating property owners on how to identify, take precautionary action, and manage lead hazards to prevent lead exposure in rental property. Hold a minimum of two (2) education programs/trainings or outreach events targeting property owners using best-practice strategies identified as highly likely to produce intended results. Report the number of people who attended each event and the specific audience(s) reached. b) Follow the LPPF Evaluation Plan, which allows you to track and report the outcomes of your outreach campaigns.  For example:
    • Number of outreach events completed;
    • Number of landlords attending events;
    • Number of community groups involved in working with landlords;
    • Number of trainings offered;
    • Number of landlords trained.
  3. a) Maintain and promote a system for educating tenants within the target area on how to identify lead hazards, how to identify lead-safe housing, and how to ensure their children are safe from lead hazards.  Hold a minimum of two (2) education programs/trainings or outreach events targeting tenants that are developed using best-practice strategies identified as highly likely to produce intended results.  Report the number of people who attended each event and the specific audience(s) reached. b) Follow the LPPF Evaluation Plan, which allows you to track and report the outcomes of your outreach campaigns. For example:
    • Number of outreach events completed;
    • Number of tenants reached;
    • Number of materials distributed;
    • Number of community groups (Collaboration).

HDA Lead Dust Testing Funds ($6,250)

Up to an additional $6,250 per HDA community is available to support free lead dust testing.  Units must be occupied by or intended for families, must lie within the targeted area, and must have been built prior to 1950.

Over the last three years the HDA free lead dust testing program was offered exclusively for rental property owners.  Evaluation of the program has revealed mixed results in the recruitment of Landlords and the number of units tested.  Community Partners have indicated that they have had increased difficulty in enrolling landlords and reaching their testing goal of 50 units.

To improve the enrollment rate and test a larger number of rental units, the HDAs will have several options and some flexibility to reach their goal.

Option 1:  Landlord Outreach Approach
Test 50 rental units working with landlords. Cost: 50 units at $125 per unit = $6,250.  When possible refer appropriate landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement.

Option 2:  Landlord & Tenant Outreach Approach
Test 25 rental units working with landlords. Cost: 25 units at $125 per unit = $3,125.  When possible, refer appropriate landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement.

Then, using the remainder of HDA lead dust testing funds ($3,125), perform lead dust tests in 25 to 62 rental units working with tenants.  This could involve a third party home visiting group (e.g.: HeadStart, Catholic Charities, Family Advocates, Neighbor to Neighbor, Cooperative Extension, etc.). 

Partners can use the $3,125 from the HDA lead dust testing funds to provide a $50 stipend for home visitors for each analyzed lead dust test kit.  At the compensation cost of $50 per analyzed test kit, a maximum of 62 rental units could be tested working with tenants through home visiting groups. 

This approach would require the home visitor to do the following:

  • Bring a lead dust test kit to the rental unit;
  • Observe the tenant performing the test. (home visitors cannot perform the test);
  • Take away the completed test kit;
  • Mail the completed lead dust test kit for analysis to the State’s Health and Environmental Testing Laboratory (HETL);
  • Track and report the number of kits completed as well as names and addresses associated with each kit;
  • Invoice the HDA for each lead dust test kit analyzed.

The lead dust test results will be sent to the State Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program and they will follow up with the tenants and landlords.

Units involved in this facilitated lead dust testing approach using home visitors should use Tenant LDT Address Sheet to report (quarterly) on locations where facilitated lead dust testing has occurred.

Option 3:  Landlord Incentive Approach
Test 25 rental units working with landlords. Cost: 25 units at $125 per unit =$3,125.  Use the remaining $3,125 from the HDA lead dust testing fund to provide participating landlords with incentive gift cards of up to a $125 value per unit to purchase supplies for lead-safe cleaning and maintenance.  Cost: 25 gift cards at $125 = $3,125.  When possible refer appropriate landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement.

Option 4:  Combination Approach
A combination of Option 2 and Option 3: 

  • Test units working with landlords, providing a $125 per unit gift card incentive to eligible landlords.  When possible, refer appropriate Landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement; and
  • Test rental units working with tenants and offering a $50 stipend for home visitors.

This combined approach allows the HDAs to be flexible in their methods to test the maximum number of rental units working within the budgeted amount of $6,250. For example: If you test 10 units working with landlords the total cost of the lead dust testing and gift cards would be $2,500. That would leave $3,750 to test up to 75 units working with tenants at $50 per unit stipend for home visitors.

Follow the LPPF Evaluation Plan, which allows you to track and report the outcomes of your outreach campaigns. For example:

  • Number and location of lead dust tests submitted for pre/post testing;
  • Number of units identified as at risk;
  • Number of units identified with lead risks which have been made lead safe;
  • Number of families assisted in identifying and living in a lead safe unit;
  • Number of trained landlords who registered units with Lead Safe Housing Registry;
  • Number of landlords (and their agents) educated to identify lead hazards and engage in lead hazard reduction activities;
  • Number of tenants educated to identify lead hazards and engage in lead hazard reduction activities.

An HMP agreeing to this award must engage a certified lead dust sampler or Lead Inspector when visual assessments of lead hazards and lead dust sampling are required. Maine CDC contracts directly with the State Health and Environmental Testing Laboratory, for payment of dust wipe analysis, so that cost does not need to be budgeted in the money the HMP receives.

Requirements/Deliverables for Second-Tier Area funding

Targeted Community Funding

Outside of the high density communities, a large portion of the elevated blood lead levels in Maine children are found within three (3) Public Health Districts:

  • Central (Augusta, Gardiner, Skowhegan, Waterville);
  • Midcoast (Bath, Rockland);
  • Western (Livermore Falls, Rumford, Turner).

(Note: Within the Midcoast District, Bath and Rockland have been identified as Second Tier high-risk communities.  These municipalities are located within the service areas of two different HMPs—ACCESS Health, and Knox County Community Health Coalition.)

The LPPF funded PHD Healthy Maine Partnerships serving these Second Tier Areas may apply for an additional $12,000 to implement a targeted outreach strategy of lead hazard awareness and risk reduction to homeowners, landlords, and tenant families.  The Second Tier Areas are expected to indentify and adapt the best communication methods and to incorporate these methods within their targeted districts/areas. 

The STAs are expected to engage other community-based organizations, as well as to offer (or to engage local partners in offering) free lead inspections (lead dust testing) for high-risk rental units.  To assist the Community Partners in reaching their targeted unit goal, there are some changes in how the lead dust testing program can be structured and implemented.  (See “STA Lead Dust Testing Funds” below.)

In combination with PHD funding ($6,500), STAs will continue to focus on education and outreach programs within the high-risk communities as well as the District.

Minimum requirements/deliverables ($12,000)

  1. Identify, with assistance of Maine CDC, the geographic or other targeting mechanism by which to determine the rental properties at highest risk of poisoning children. Focus activities in this defined area. 
  2. a) Maintain and promote a system for identifying and working with owners of rental properties within your target area.  This system will include educating property owners on how to identify, take precautionary action, and manage lead hazards to prevent lead exposure in rental property. Hold a minimum of two (2) education programs/trainings or outreach events targeting property owners using best-practice strategies identified as highly likely to produce intended results. Report the number of people who attended each event and the specific audience(s) reached. b) Follow the LPPF Evaluation Plan, which allows you to track and report the outcomes of your outreach campaigns.  For example:
    • Number of outreach events completed;
    • Number of landlords attending events;
    • Number of community groups involved in working with landlords;
    • Number of trainings offered;
    • Number of landlords trained.
  3. a) Maintain and promote a system for educating tenants within the target area on how to identify lead hazards, how to identify lead-safe housing, and how to ensure their children are safe from lead hazards. Hold a minimum of two (2) education programs/trainings or outreach events targeting tenants that are developed using best-practice strategies identified as highly likely to produce intended results.  Report the number of people who attended each event and the specific audience(s) reached. b) Follow the LPPF Evaluation Plan, which allows you to track and report the outcomes of your outreach campaigns. For example:
    • Number of outreach events completed;
    • Number of tenants reached;
    • Number of materials distributed;
    • Number of community groups (Collaboration).

Second-Tier Area Lead Dust Testing Funds ($3,125)

Up to an additional $3,125 per STA is available to support free lead hazard inspections. Units must be occupied by or intended for families, must lie within the targeted area, and must have been built prior to 1950.

Over the last two years, the STA free lead dust testing program was offered exclusively for rental property owners.  Evaluation of the program has revealed mixed results in the recruitment of landlords and the number of units tested.  Community Partners have indicated that enrolling landlords and reaching testing goal of 25 units is difficult.

To improve the enrollment rate and test a larger number of rental units, the STAs will have several options and some flexibility to reach their goal.

Option 1:  Landlord Outreach Approach
Test 25 rental units working with landlords. Cost: 25 units at $125 = $3,125. When possible, refer appropriate landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement.

Option 2:  Landlord & Tenant Outreach Approach
Test 13 rental units working with landlords. Cost: 13 units at $125 = $1,625. When possible, refer appropriate landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement.

Then, using the remainder of the STA lead dust testing funds ($1,500), perform lead dust tests in 12 to 30 rental units working with tenants.  This could involve a third party home visiting group (e.g.; HeadStart, Catholic Charities, Family Advocates, Neighbor to Neighbor, Cooperative Extension, etc.). 

Partners can use the $1,500 from the STA lead dust testing funds to provide a $50 stipend for home visitors for each analyzed lead dust test kit.  At the compensation cost of $50 per analyzed test kit, a maximum of 30 rental units could be tested working with tenants through home visiting groups. 

This approach would require the home visitor to do the following.

  • Bring a lead dust test kit to the rental unit;
  • Observe the tenant performing the test. (home visitors cannot perform test);\
  • Take away the completed test kit;
  • Mail the completed lead dust test kit for analysis to the State’s Health and Environmental Testing Laboratory (HETL);
  • Track and report the number of kits completed as well as names and addresses associated with each kit;
  • Invoice the HDA for each lead dust test kit analyzed.

The lead dust test results will be sent to the state Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program and they will follow up with the tenants and landlords.

Option 3:  Landlord Incentive Approach
Test 13 rental units working with landlords.  Cost: 13 units at $125 per unit =$1,625). Use the remaining $1,500 from the HDA lead dust testing fund to provide participating landlords with incentive gift cards of up to a $125 value per unit to purchase supplies for lead-safe cleaning and maintenance.  Cost: 13 gift cards at $125 = $1,625.  (This will put the lead dust testing fund over budget by $125.  The extra $125 gift card can be purchased using STA minimum requirement funds.)  When possible, refer appropriate landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement.

Option 4:  Combination Approach
A combination of Option 2 and Option 3: 

  • Test units working with landlords, providing a $125 per unit gift card incentive to eligible landlords.  When possible, refer appropriate Landlords to the HUD Lead Hazard Control Grant for lead abatement; and
  • Test rental units working with tenants and offering a $50 stipend for home visitors.

This, combined approach allows the HDAs to be flexible in their methods to test the maximum number of rental units working within the budgeted amount of $3,125.  For example:  If you test 5 units working with landlords the total cost of the lead dust testing and gift cards would be $1,250.  That would leave $1,875 to test up to 37 units working with tenants at $50 per unit stipend for home visitors.

Follow the LPPF Evaluation Plan, which allows you to track and report the outcomes of your outreach campaigns. For example:

  • Number and location of lead dust tests submitted for pre/post testing;
  • Number of units identified as at risk;
  • Number of units identified with lead risks which have been made lead safe;
  • Number of families assisted in identifying and living in a lead safe unit;
  • Number of trained landlords who registered units with Lead Safe Housing Registry;
  • Number of landlords (and their agents) educated to identify lead hazards and engage in lead hazard reduction activities;
  • Number of tenants educated to identify lead hazards and engage in lead hazard reduction activities.

An HMP agreeing to this award must engage a certified lead dust sampler or Lead Inspector when visual assessments of lead hazards and lead dust sampling are required.  Maine CDC contracts directly with the State Health and Environmental Testing Laboratory, for payment of dust wipe analysis, so that cost does not need to be budgeted in the money the HMP receives.