Furbearers

Beaver

Beavers are fascinating creatures to observe. Watch this beaver swim in her pool, chomp on browse and work on building her lodge. Learn more about beavers from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.


Bobcat

A bobcat weighs between 15-35 lbs, and is strong and fierce enough to take down a deer! The bobcat is found only in North America. Learn more about bobcats from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.


Coyote

The coyote is capable of running at speeds of more than 30 mph. Its distinct howl, coupled with short high-pitched yelps, can be heard as far away as 3 miles. Coyotes are very adaptable, living in many different kinds of habitats, including deep forest, suburban areas and even in cities like Portland, Augusta and Bangor. Learn more about coyotes from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.


Fisher

The fisher is one of the only animals that can successfully attack, kill and eat a porcupine. Fisher have become more adapted to living in forests in more suburban areas, and are responsible for preying on local house cats. Learn more about fishers from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.


Gray Fox

This species of fox is found most commonly in the southern and central parts of Maine. They are quite adept at climbing trees! A very pretty animal, the gray fox takes a variety of prey; but will also eat apples, berries, corn and other fruit and vegetable crops! Learn more about gray foxes from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.


Raccoon

The raccoon is an excellent climber and swimmer. It eats freshwater mussels, crayfish, nuts, berries, eggs, insects and a variety of other foods but contrary to popular believe, it does not wash everything it eats. Learn more about raccoons from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.


Red Fox

A very common animal statewide, red foxes can comfortably live in close proximity to humans in agricultural areas and the suburbs. Learn more about red foxes from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.


Skunk

A skunk can fire 2 or 3 blasts of scent in quick succession and can launch the evil-smelling stuff for up to 12 feet! Skunks do not hibernate in winter, but will den up for weeks at time when the weather is bad. They will emerge when clearing and/or warming temperatures occur. Learn more about skunks from Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.