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Standard 1 Resources for Induction

Supporting policies and procedures for a district induction program are provided.

a. Board policies and district procedures exist to support the local induction program

The New Teacher Center (NTC) at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  NTC is focused on teacher and administrator induction, and is involved in numerous local, state, and national partnerships.  Articles and monographs on the topic of Teacher Induction are available online at the NTC Web site.  Retrieved February 10, 2007 from http://www.newteachercenter.org/ti_articles.php

Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation.  (1997). From Students of Teaching to Teachers of Students: Teacher Induction Around the Pacific Rim Overview of teacher induction policy and practice: results of the exploratory survey. (Issue brief No. 97-HR-01.1). Washington, DC: Authors Jay Moskowitz and Maria Stephens report on the state of policy and practice in teacher induction programs among Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation members. Retrieved February 10, 2007 from US Department of Education web site. http://www.ed.gov/pubs/APEC/index.html

Fideler, Elizabeth F.  and Haselkorn, David (1999) Learning the Ropes: Urban Teacher Induction Programs and Practices in the United States. Belmont, MA. Recruiting New Teachers, Inc.  Executive Summary is available at Web site of the Pew Charitable Trust.  http://www.pewtrusts.com/pubs/pubs_item.cfm?content_item_id=317&content_type_id=8&page=p1

Robinson, G.W. (1998).  New Teacher Induction: A Study of Selected New Teacher Induction Models and Common Practices. A paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Educational Research Association (Chicago, IL, October 14-17, 1998). Full text available at ERIC - the Education Resources Information Center as publication ED424219.  http://eric.ed.gov/

Saphier, Jon, Freedman, Susan and Aschheim, Barbara, (2001) Beyond Mentoring: How to Attract, Support and Retain New Teachers (pp. 26, 70-72, 75, 104, 106-107).  TEACHERS21, 2345, Washington St., Newton, MA 02462, Book available from TEACHERS21.at  http://www.teachers21.org
PDF version retrieved online February 10, 2007 from TEACHERS21 Web site. http://www.teachers21.org/documents/beyondmentoringwebtext.pdf

NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education, (1999) Creating a Teacher Mentoring Program.  A paper based on the proceedings of NFIE's Teacher Mentoring Symposium, co-hosted with United Teachers Los Angeles in 1999. Washington, DC 20036.  Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from http://www.neafoundation.org/publications/mentoring.htm

Kardos, Susan and Moore Johnson, Susan. (2007) On Their Own and Presumed Expert: New Teachers’ Experience with Their Colleagues. Moore Johnson. Teachers College Record Volume 109 Number 12. Available from http://www.tcrecord.org/content.asp?contentid=12812

Bartell, Carol, (2004) Cultivating High-Quality Teaching Through Induction and Mentoring. This book highlights the key elements of successful induction and mentoring program. Available from Corwin Press at http://www.corwinpress.com

The Annenberg Institute for Social Reform.  Professional Learning Communities: Professional Development Strategies That Improve Instruction. Providence, RI: The Annenberg Institute for Social Reform. This document contains concise and comprehensive research with useable information for schools to use when planning professional development to improve instruction.   Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from http://www.annenberginstitute.org/images/ProfLearning.pdf

Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (1997) Professional Learning Communities: What Are They And Why Are They Important?  This online paper explains the structure of and importance of Professional Learning Communities.  It also includes a helpful list of references at the end of the research.  Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from Southwest Educational Development Laboratory (1997) Professional Learning Communities: What Are They And Why Are They Important? This online paper explains the structure of and importance of Professional Learning Communities. It also includes a helpful list of references at the end of the research. Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from http://www.sedl.org/change/issues/issues61.html

Professional Learning Communities: A List of Resources: The Center for Teaching Quality has developed an impressive list of resources to help schools use professional learning communities for professional development and ultimately for the improvement of teacher quality. Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from http://www.teacherleaders.org/resources/plc.htm

Professional Learning Communities: a list of resources recommended by the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) to help schools develop a Professional Learning Community.  Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from http://www.maineascd.org/tools/plc.htm

All Things PLC in One Place.  This web site features research and helpful resources on Professional Learning Communities. Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from http://www.allthingsplc.info/

 

b. Incentives exist for mentors.

NEA Foundation for the Improvement of Education, (1999) Creating a Teacher Mentoring Program.  A paper based on the proceedings of NFIE's Teacher Mentoring Symposium, co-hosted with United Teachers Los Angeles in 1999. Washington, DC 20036.  Retrieved on February 10, 2007 from http://www.neafoundation.org/publications/mentoring.htm

Portner, Hal (2001). Training Mentors Is Not Enough:  Everything Else Schools and Districts Need to Do. (pp. 58-59). Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press, Inc. http://www.corwinpress.com

Feeney Jonson, Kathleen. (2002) Being an Effective Mentor: How to Help Beginning Teachers Succeed (pp. 122-129).  Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press, Inc. http://www.corwinpress.com

Saphier, Jon, Freedman, Susan and Aschheim, Barbara, (2001) Beyond Mentoring: How to Attract, Support and Retain New Teachers. TEACHERS21, 2345, Washington St., Newton, MA 02462, Book available from TEACHERS21 Web site. http://www.teachers21.org  PDF version retrieved online February 10, 2007 from TEACHERS21 Web Site. http://www.teachers21.org/documents/beyondmentoringwebtext.pdf

c. Time is provided for mentor and beginning educator to meet weekly and observe in other classrooms periodically.

Lipton, Laura, Wellman, Bruce, Humbard, Carlette (2001). Mentoring Matters (pp. 29-40), MiraVia, LLC Sherman CT, Available from MiraVia Web site http://www.miravia.com/

Portner, Hal (2001). Training mentors is not enough: Everything else schools and districts need to do. (pp. 55-58). Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press, Inc. http://www.corwinpress.com

Feeney Jonson, Kathleen. (2002) Being an Effective Mentor: How to Help Beginning Teachers Succeed (pp. 71, 96-97, 121-122, 143-148).  Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press, Inc.  http://www.corwinpress.com

d. Beginning educator assignments and schedules are equitable.

Saphier, Jon, Freedman, Susan and Aschheim, Barbara, (2001) Beyond Mentoring: How to Attract, Support and Retain New Teachers (p.62).  TEACHERS21, 2345, Washington St., Newton, MA 02462, Book available from TEACHERS21 Web site. http://www.teachers21.org  PDF version retrieved online February 10, 2007 from TEACHERS21 Web Site. http://www.teachers21.org/documents/beyondmentoringwebtext.pdf

 

e. A provision is in place for content mentoring.

Portner, Hal (2001). Training Mentors Is Not Enough: Everything Else Schools and Districts Need to Do. (p. 67). Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press, Inc. http://www.corwinpress.com

The Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance (MMSA) PO Box 5359 Augusta, ME 04332. Telephone 207 287-6646  MMSA is a K-12 science and mathematics education organization in Maine.  It provides content mentoring through a variety of programs and projects.  http://www.mmsa.org/   For additional information contact Page Keeley, Senior Program Director, K-12 Science.  pkeeley@mmsa.org

Information about MMSA’s current projects is available at http://www.mmsa.org/science/science_NSF_projects.php

eMentoring for Student Success (eMSS). Program delivers mentoring for beginning science teachers via an online technology platform. The Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance is the lead organization for eMSS in Maine.  Information available at http://emss.nsta.org/

The Northern New England Co Mentoring Network (NNECN) is a collaborative effort of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont.  NNECN offers a three-year program of professional development for middle and high school mathematics and science teachers. Maine Mathematics and Science Alliance is a partner organization.  http://www.nnecn.org/