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Updated 03/10/06 ... wsl

 

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Status of Maine Schools 

For Immediate Release: Thursday, September 22, 2005

Contact:  Commissioner's Office, 624-6620

Commissioner Susan A. Gendron Releases Report on the Status of Maine Schools in Meeting No Child Left Behind (NCLB)Adequate Yearly Progress(AYP) Requirements

 

AUGUSTA -- According to Susan A. Gendron, Maine Commissioner of Education, 489 of Maine's 706 tested public schools (69 %) have met No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for 2005 as measured by the 2004-2005 results of the Maine Educational Assessment (MEA) given to grades four, eight, and eleven in every public school in Maine last March. Sixty-nine schools (9 %) require further analysis for a determination. One hundred schools (14 %) did not meet AYP for the first time in either math or reading, or both and are designated as Monitor Schools. Forty-eight schools (7 %) did not meet AYP in either math or reading, or both, for the second or third consecutive year and are designated as Continuous Improvement Priority Schools.

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In addition:

  • Every Maine school met the AYP threshold for participation with 99.5% of Maine's 45,110 fourth, eighth and eleventh graders taking the test.  
  • Of the 46 schools designated as Continuous Improvement Priority Schools for 2004-2005, 23 (50 %) made AYP in the subject identified for improvement.
  • Of the 63 schools identified for not meeting AYP in reading for the first time last year, 42 (67%) met AYP in reading this year.
  • Of the 16 schools identified for not meeting AYP in math for the first time last year, 10 (63 %) have met AYP this year in that subject.
  • Of the 80 schools identified as Monitor Schools for not meeting AYP in reading for the first time with the new higher performance target, 37 (46 %) were identified for the whole group.
  • Of the 65 schools identified as Monitor Schools for not meeting AYP in math for the first time with the new higher performance target, 41  (63 %) were identified for the students with disabilities sub-group and 25 (38%) for the economically disadvantaged subgroup. No schools had enrollments in other subgroups sufficient for identification.
  • The 48 schools identified this year as not meeting AYP in reading, math, or both for the second or third consecutive year are designated as Continuous Improvement Priority schools and must focus improvement efforts on the whole group or subgroup for which the school was identified.

Schools identified as not having met AYP for two consecutive years are expected to engage in an analysis of what has worked, what has not, and what needs to happen in their school to meet both State and federal expectations for student achievement. Schools that do not meet AYP for two or more consecutive years in a row and that receive federal funding for disadvantaged students through Title I of NCLB must develop and implement a formal improvement plan. Federal money is provided to Maine to assist these schools in their efforts.

Though the process of being identified as a Continuous Improvement Priority School (CIPS) is difficult for any school, the success stories of how individual schools named as CIPS schools have met the challenge speak powerfully to the stamina of Maine educators and their intense commitment to serving students well. With the right combination of strategies and support, schools can develop and implement effective improvement plans that serve to increase student achievement and move the schools forward as continuously improving organizations. Some Title I CIPS schools that have tackled this daunting task and achieved success speak about their outcomes with eloquence and great pride:

Emden Elementary School Jean Butler, Principal

READING - Grade 4

Does Not Meet

Partially Meets

Meets the Standard

Exceeds the Standard

2004-2005

0

0

100

0

2003-2004

0

42

58

0

2002-2003

0

31

69

0

2001-2002

25

67

8

0

MATHEMATICS - Grade 4

Does Not Meet

Partially Meets

Meets the Standard

Exceeds the Standard

2004-2005

0

37

55

8

2003-2004

0

67

33

0

2002-2003

31

31

38

0

2001-2002

54

38

8

0

Embden Elementary School is the first school in Maine to have every fourth grade student meet standards of the Maine Learning Results in Reading. This 100% proficiency is especially remarkable because just four years ago, the school was identified as a Continuous Improvement Priority School because 92% of their students did not meet the grade-level standard. That year,

SAD 74 volunteered for the Maine Department of Education's School Improvement Pilot Project. Since then the school has been involved in intensive professional development for all teachers. Principal Jean Butler said, "Our grade 4 scores are the result of good teaching and students working hard in every grade Kindergarten through grade 4." There has been similar dramatic improvement in mathematics in Embden. In 2001-2002, 8% of fourth graders met the grade level standard. Last year, 2004-2005, 63% of the students met the standard.

St. Albans Elementary School Chris Gee, Principal

READING - Grade 4

Does Not Meet

Partially Meets

Meets the Standard

Exceeds the Standard

2004-2005

0

28

72

0

2003-2004

0

13

87

0

2002-2003

39

44

17

0

2001-2002

34

52

14

0

St. Albans Consolidated School has sustained dramatic gains in student performance in reading for a second year. From 2001 to 2003, only 15% of students met the standard in reading, which resulted in being identified as a Continuous Improvement Priority School. For each of the past two years, 2003-2005, 80% of St. Albans fourth graders have met the standard in reading.

Kermit Nickerson School, Catherine Miklovich, Principal

Reading Grade 4

Kermit Nickerson School in Belfast has improved reading results on the MEA for four consecutive years. In 2001-2002 the school was identified as a Continuous Improvement Priority School because 20% of the fourth grade students met the standard on the MEA. The next year, 2002-2003, 24%, met the standard. In 2003-2004, 71% met the standard and last year, 2004-2005, 77% met the standard.

King Middle School, Michael McCarthy, Principal

Reading and Math, grade 8

King is a large middle school in Portland that did not make adequate yearly progress for two years, 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 in reading. Last year there was dramatic improvement in both reading and math. The percent of King students proficient in reading improved from 35% to 55% and the percent of students proficient in math improved from 22% to 37%, both above the state average. The number of proficient readers improved from 52 to 83 in one year.

More Information

In a few weeks the MDOE will publish a list of consistently high performing schools and a list of consistently improving schools.

Commissioner Gendron stated, "Without question, the term accountability has taken on new and more significant meaning with the adoption of the Maine Learning Results and with the passage of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. It will continue to take local, State, and national efforts to bring about significant improvement. We are pleased with the decrease this year in the overall number of Continuous Improvement Priority Schools (CIPS) and the decrease in the overall number of schools identified as Monitor schools.  Of concern is that the preliminary data indicates increases in the subject of math, in subgroups looking at whole group, and in the students with disabilities and the economically disadvantaged subgroups.  This points to the additional challenges to get all students where they need to be for life in the 21st century.

This data is an important tool.  Whether individuals or communities agree with the level of rigor that Maine's Learning Results demand, or the intricacies of No Child Let Behind Adequate Yearly Progress determinations, the reality is that if the goal in Maine is to truly prepare all students well and have them graduate from high school having met the Learning Results, there must be collaboration for that common purpose."

At the national level, a number of aspects of the federal law continue to be the subject of suggestions and proposals for modification, not the least of which is the concern that students with disabilities are being expected to achieve at the same levels and within the same timeframe as their non-disabled peers. In addition, a number of proposals have surfaced that would allow states to use a value-added or growth factor to determine AYP. These and other possible modifications will be included for consideration as the federal law is discussed before the 2007-2008 reauthorization takes place.

For more information regarding AYP, contact:  Rachelle Tome, NCLB Coordinator for AYP at (207) 624-6705.

For information on how AYP is determined, see the AYP Fact Sheet at http://www.maine.gov/education/nclb/AdequateYearlyProgress.pdf  

For further information on NCLB and Adequate Yearly Progress from a national perspective, please visit the Council of Chief State School Officers website at http://www.ccsso.org/ and the United States Department of Education website at http://www.ed.gov/index.jhtml

The following links are the 2005-06 AYP School Status Lists:

Grade 4

Grade 8

Grade 11