Maine Cooperative Snow Survey

This information is provided by a partnership with Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry, Maine Geological Survey and the USGS New England Water Science Center, Maine Office.

Completed/Projected Surveys: | January 4, 2017 | February 1, 2017 | March 1, 2017 | March 8, 2017 | March 15, 2017 | March 22, 2017 | March 29, 2017 | April 5, 2017 | April 12, 2017 | April 19, 2017 | April 26, 2017 | May 3, 2017 | 

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Survey Date Equivalent Water Content in Snowpack Change in Water Content from Preceding Survey Snowpack Depth Snowpack Density Water Content in Snowpack Compared to Historical Values Mean Water Content in a Drainage Basin ASCII Text File
May 3, 2017

We received seven observations of zero snow and one with only trace amounts of snow for this survey, the last of 2017. Thank you to all our contributors who make the Maine Cooperative Snow Survey possible. See you in January 2018!

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April 26, 2017

We received only 24 observations in Maine and 12 from New Brunswick for the penultimate snow survey of 2017. Many areas in northwestern and western Maine did not have enough data coverage to create reasonable snow estimates, and those areas are indicated as “No data” on the maps. 17 of the 24 sites in Maine reported zero or trace amounts of snow. A site near Winterville Plantation has the most snow and water content, with 12.3 inches of snow and 4.3 inches of equivalent water content.

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April 19, 2017

We received 53 observations with 32 reporting zero or trace amounts of snow! The most snow and highest water content was observed in Bald Mountain Township, with 18.8 inches of snow and 7 inches of equivalent water content.

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April 12, 2017

We received 84 observations for this snow survey, with 15 sites reporting zero or trace amounts of snow. The deepest snow in the state was 29.15 inches in Newry at Screw Auger Falls, and the most water content was 10.05 inches in Monson.

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April 5, 2017

There is still plenty of snow around for this snow survey! We have received 93 observations. Lower Cupsuptic Township again had the deepest snow at 47.3 inches and the most equivalent water content at 13.8 inches.

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March 29, 2017

We received 84 observations from across Maine and into New Hampshire during this snow survey. In Maine, the highest values were reported in Monson with 31.5 inches of snow and 14.15 inches of equivalent water content.

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March 22, 2017

The dates for this snow survey were extended to include observations taken on March 17 and 18 in the Upper Penobscot, Upper Androscoggin, and Upper Kennebec watershed, so we can see the full effect of Winter Storm Stella. We received 104 observations, with the deepest snow in Lower Cupsuptic Township (43.6 inches) and the highest water content at Crawford Pond in TA R11 WELS (17 inches).

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March 15, 2017

We received 76 observations for this snow survey, all taken before significant snowfall from Winter Storm Stella. Monson had the deepest snow (29.25 inches), and Long A Township had the highest equivalent water content (16.2 inches). We have had reports with unusually high densities, which may be due to the large amount of ice present in the snow pack – one observer commented that he was doing an ice survey, not a snow survey!

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March 8, 2017

We received 76 observations for the fourth snow survey of 2017. Monson is showing the greatest amount of snow and equivalent water content at 26.3 and 12.65 inches, respectively. Four sites near the coast between Hope and Waltham reported no snow on the ground.

Maps and data file were updated 3/10/2017 with 2 additional observations.

Data file updated 3/15/2017 with 4 additional observations. Maps were not updated.

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March 1, 2017

We received 164 observations for the most extensive snow survey of 2017: 135 in Maine, 25 in New Hampshire, and 4 in New Brunswick, Canada. The deepest observed snow depth (40.3 inches) and most water content (16.4 inches) reported fell just off the western edge of our map in New Hampshire at a site in Dixville Township. Within Maine, 37 inches of snow and 12.75 inches of equivalent water content were reported from a site near Height of Land, Rangeley. Snow surveys will now be conducted every week until the snow is gone.

Maps and data file were updated on 3/3/2017 with 14 additional observations, bringing the total count up to 178 overall and 149 for Maine.

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February 1, 2017

The second snow survey for the 2017 season comprised 116 observations. The deepest snow at 35.8 inches and the highest water content at 9.5 inches were both observed at Crawford Pond in Piscataquis County. This survey saw a large variation in snow density. An extremely high density of 0.63 was measured in South Berwick, where the observer reported extremely hard crusts from recent sleet. A very low density was measured in Bar Harbor where there was 3 inches of very fluffy powder.

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January 4, 2017

Eighty-six sites were measured during the first week of the 2017 Maine Cooperative Snow Survey. The town of Portage Lake in Aroostook County had both the deepest snow at 38 inches and the highest water content with 8.6 inches of water. The next snow survey will start on the 30th of January.

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Map and Data Type Descriptions
Equivalent water content in snowpack: Maps of equivalent water content in the snowpack in 1-inch increments based on measurements obtained from the sources listed above.
Change in water content from preceding survey: Maps of the change in equivalent water content in the snowpack from the preceding survey.  Only prepared while weekly surveys are being conducted.
Snowpack depth: Snowpack depth in 6-inch increments based on measurements obtained from the sources listed above.
Snowpack density: Snowpack density (water equivalent in inches divided by snowpack depth in inches) based on measurements obtained from the sources listed above. A snowpack with densities above 0.33 is considered "ripe". A ripe snowpack no longer has the ability to absorb rainfall and would tend to release water during a rain event.
Equivalent water content in snowpack compared to historical values: These maps (called quartile maps) show areas where measured values of water content are in the lowest 25-percent of measured values (significantly below normal values), the middle 50-percent of measured values (roughly normal for this time of year), or upper 25-percent of measured values (significantly above (normal).
Mean water content in a drainage basin: Mean water content in a drainage basin. It is calculated by finding the mean value of water content in a basin from the equivalent water content map above. This average water content in the basin is used in some National Weather Service river flow models.
ASCII text file of snowpack data: An ASCII text file of the data used in preparing the maps for the current survey.  Includes the site id, site name, site latitude and longitude (in decimal degrees), site elevation (feet above mean sea level), the survey date, and the depth, equivalent water content, and density of the snowpack.