Cultural and Religious Observances by School Year

2021-2022 School Year
2021
August

August 13-15 

  • Obon (Buddhist) - An annual three-day festival honoring one’s ancestors. (Depending on the region, Obon may be observed July 13-15.) 

August 14 

  • Qixi Festival (Chinese heritage) - Also known as Chinese Valentine’s Day, the festival is based on a romantic legend about a weaver girl and an ox herd. The festival is also known as Double Seventh Festival because it is celebrated on the 7th day in the 7th month of the Chinese lunar calendar. 

August 19 

  • Ashura (Islamic) - A day in Muharram, the first month of the Islamic calendar, that commemorates God saving Moses from the Egyptians. For Shia-Muslims, it is a day of mourning the martyrdom of Hussein in 680 AD. Ashura is an Islamic holy day. 

August 22 

  • Ullambana (Buddhist) - Ullambana means “deliverance from suffering,” and specifically refers to the salvation of anguished souls in Hell. This concept originates from the Buddhist legend of Maudgalyayana saving his mother from Hades. The Ullambana festival reinforces the important concept of filial piety which is deep-rooted in Asian culture. 

August 26 

  • Women’s Equality Day (National observance) - A day commemorating the passage of the 19th Amendment and the continued work of women toward full equality. 

August 30 

  • Krishna Janmashtami (Hinduism) - A celebration of the anniversary of the birth of Lord Krishna. Krishna Janmashtami begins at sundown on August 29. 


September

September 6 

  • Labor Day (National observance) - Created by the labor movement to honor the social and economic achievements of American workers. 

September 7-8 

  • Rosh Hashanah (Judaism) - The first High Holiday signifying the beginning of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashanah is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on September 6. 

September 10 

  • Ganesh Chaturthi (Hinduism) - A festival celebrating the birth anniversary of Lord Ganesha. 

September 15-October 15 

  • Hispanic Heritage Month (National observance) - A month to pay tribute to the contributions of the Latino and Hispanic communities, and highlighting their diversity, culture and traditions. 

September 16 

  • Yom Kippur (Judaism) - The holiest day of the year in Judaism known as Day of Atonement. Yom Kippur is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on September 15. 

  • Día de la Independencia (Mexican heritage) - Mexico celebrates its independence from Spain. Día de la Independencia begins at sundown on September 15. 

September 20-24 

  • National Deaf Awareness Week (National observance) - Promoting awareness of the deaf and hard of hearing community and its culture and heritage. 

September 21 

  • Mid-Autumn Festival (Chinese heritage) - A celebration of hard work and harvest, as well as time for families to reunite. 

  • Mabon (Pagan/Wiccan) - Occurring at the autumn equinox, it is a time of gratitude and sharing with others. 

September 21-27 

  • Sukkot (Judaism) - A festival of giving thanks for the fall harvest and a commemoration of the 40 years of Jewish wandering in the desert after the giving of the Torah at Mt. Sinai. Sukkot is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on September 20. 

September 28 

  • Shemini Atzeret (Judaism) - Shemini Atzeret means “the eighth day of assembly” and is celebrated on the 22nd day of the Hebrew month Tishrei, following directly after the seven-day celebration of Sukkot. Shemini Atzeret is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on September 27. 

September 29 

  • Simchat Torah (Judaism) - Simchat Torah means “Rejoicing in the Torah” and marks the completion of the annual cycle of weekly Torah readings. Simchat Torah is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on September 28. 


October

October 1-31 

  • Disability Employment Awareness Month (National observance) - A national campaign that raises awareness of employment issues for people with disabilities and celebrates the contributions of America’s workers with disabilities. 

  • Italian American Heritage Month | National observance - Celebrates and honors the achievements and contributions of Italian immigrants and their descendants in the United States. 

  • LGBT History Month (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A time to bring awareness and recognize important moments in the history of lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender people. 

October 7-15 

  • Navaratri (Hinduism) - A festival celebrated over nine nights near harvest time when the nine forms of Goddess Durga are worshipped. 

October 11 

  • National Coming Out Day (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A national day to celebrate coming out and promote a safe world for LGBTQ individuals to live truthfully and openly. 

  • Indigenous Peoples' Day – (national observance) - celebrates and honors Native American peoples and commemorates their histories and cultures 

October 15 

  • Dussehra (Hinduism) - A festival symbolizing the victory of good over evil, commemorating the victory of Lord Rama over the demon Ravana. 

October 19 

  • Mawlid (Islamic) - A festival celebrating the birthday of Prophet Muhammad. Mawlid is an Islamic holy day and begins at sundown on October 18. 

October 31 

  • Reformation Day (Christian) - A day marking the beginning of the Protestant Reformation in 1517. 


November

November 1-30 

  • National Native American Indian Heritage Month (National observance) - National Native American Indian Heritage Month celebrates and recognizes the accomplishments of the peoples who were the original inhabitants, explorers and settlers of the United States. 

November 1 

  • All Saints Day (Christianity) - A commemoration of all the saints of the church, known and unknown, who have attained heaven. 

  • Samhain (Pagan/Wiccan) - Samhain is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter. It occurs about halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. Samhain begins at sundown on October 31. 

November 1-2 

  • Día De Los Muertos Day of the Dead (Mexican heritage) - A 2-day celebration when it is believed the passageway between the real world and the spirit world is open so deceased loved ones can visit. 

November 2 

  • All Souls Day (Christianity) - Commemoration of those who have died and are now in purgatory being made pure before entering the presence of God in Heaven. 

November 4 

  • Diwali (Hinduism) - A religious festival also known as Deepavali and the festival of lights signifying the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil and hope over despair. 

November 6 

  • Birth of the Bab (Bahá’I) - Observance of the anniversary of the 1819 birth of Siyyid, the Bab, prophet and forerunner of the Bahá’i faith. Birth of the Bab is a Bahá'i holy day and begins at sundown on November 5. 

November 7 

  • Birth of Bahá’u’lláh (Bahá’I) - A holy day celebrating the birth of Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Bahá’i faith. Birth of Bahá’u’lláh is a Bahá'i holy day and begins at sundown on November 6. 

November 9-10 

  • Kristallnacht (Judaism) - The Night of Broken Glass commemorates the attacks against Jewish people throughout Germany and Austria in 1938. 

November 11 

  • Veterans Day (National observance) - A celebration of U.S. military veterans. 

November 16 

  • International Day for Tolerance (International observance) - Bringing public awareness to the dangers of intolerance and a commitment to promote tolerance and non-violence through education, science, culture and communication. 

November 20 

  • Transgender Day of Remembrance (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A day to honor the memory of transgender people who lost their lives because of anti-transgender violence. 

November 25 

  • Day of the Covenant (Bahá’I) - A festival commemorating Bahá’u’lláh’s appointment of his eldest son, ‘Abdul-Baha, as the Center of his Covenant.  Day of the Covenant is a Bahá'i holy day and begins at sundown on November 24. 

  • Thanksgiving Day (National observance) - Commemorates the Pilgrims’ harvest feast in the autumn of 1621. It is considered by some to be a “national day of mourning” in recognition of the conquest of Native Americans by colonists. 

November 29-December 6 

  • Chanukah (Judaism) - An eight-day holiday, also known as the Festival of Lights, commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem in 2nd century BCE. Chanukah begins at sundown on November 28. 

November 30 

  • St. Andrew’s Day (Scottish observance) - A national holiday marking the beginning of Scotland as a nation. 


December

December 3 

  • International Day of Disabled Persons (International observance) - An observance promoting the rights and well-being and increasing the awareness of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life. 

December 6 

  • End of Chanukah (Judaism) - An eight-day holiday, also known as the Festival of Lights, commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem in 2nd century BCE.  Chanukah begins at sundown on November 28. 

December 8 

  • Bodhi Day (Buddhist) - Commemorates the day when Buddha, Siddhartha Guatama, attained enlightenment. 

December 10 

  • Human Rights Day (National observance) - On this day in 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 

December 21 

  • Yule, Winter Solstice (Pagan/Wiccan) - Marks the first day of the winter season, the longest night and shortest day in the Northern hemisphere. 

December 25 

  • Christmas (Christianity) - Commemorates the birth of Jesus. 

December 26-January 1

  • Kwanzaa (African American heritage) - A seven-day African American and pan-African holiday celebrating family, community and culture. 


2022
January

January 1 

  • New Year’s Day (National observance) - The first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar. 
  • Shogatsu (Japanese heritage) - The official and cultural New Year’s Day in modern Japan. 
  • Solemnity of Mary (Christianity) - A day honoring Mary as the Mother of God. 

January 6 

  • Epiphany (Christianity) - Recognition of the manifestation of God to the world. 

January 14 

  • Makar Sankranti (Hinduism) - Observed on the first day of the tenth solar month of the Hindu calendar when the sun moves from Dhanu Rashi (Sagittarius) to Makar Rashi (Capricorn). 

January 17 

  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day (National observance) - A day to honor the birthday (January 15th) and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 
  • Tu BiShvat (Judaism) - This day marks the beginning of the “new year” for trees when the earliest blooming trees emerge from their winter sleep and begin a new fruit-bearing cycle. Tu BiShvat begins at sundown on January 16. 

January 18 

  • Mahayana New Year (Buddhist) - Recognition of the new year which begins with the first full moon in January.

February

February 1 

  • African American History Month (National observance) - A month-long celebration to honor generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society. 
  • Lunar New Year (Chinese heritage) - The beginning of a new year on the lunar calendar, marking the end of winter and the beginning of spring. 2022 is the Year of the Tiger. 

February 2 

  • Imbolc (Pagan/Wiccan) - Based on Celtic tradition marking the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. 

February 5 

  • Vasant Panchami (Hinduism) - A festival marking the beginning of spring. 

February 15 

  • Lantern Festival (Chinese heritage) - A spring festival marking the end of the Chinese New Year period.       

March

March 1 

  • Irish American Heritage Month (National observance) - Recognition of the contributions of Irish Americans to our nation’s history. 
  • National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month (National observance) - A grassroots initiative to raise awareness of people with developmental disabilities. 
  • Women’s History Month (National observance) - A celebration of women’s contribution to history, culture and society. 
  • Maha Shivaratri (Hinduism) - Also known as the Great Night of Shiva, this festival is observed annually to honor Lord Shiva. 

March 2 

  • Ash Wednesday (Christianity) - Marks the start of the season of Lent in Western Christianity. 
  • Lent (Christianity) - Lent is the Christian season of spiritual preparation before Easter, beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Holy Thursday. Lent ends on April 14. 

March 16 

  • Purim (Judaism) - Commemorates the day the Jewish people were saved from execution in ancient Persia. Purim begins on the evening of March 16 ends on the evening of March 17.       

March 19 

  • Holi (Hinduism) - A festival marking the end of winter and beginning of spring. Also known as the festival of colors and the festival of love. 

March 20 

  • Ostara (Pagan/Wiccan) - A festival celebrating the spring equinox. 

March 21 

  • International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (International observance) - A day of action to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination worldwide. 
  • Naw-Ruz (Bahá’I) - A festival celebrating the Bahá’i new year and ending the annual 19-day fast. Naw-Ruz is a Bahá’i holy day. 

March 31 

  • Cesar Chavez Day (National observance) - Honors Mexican American farm worker, labor leader and activist Cesar Chavez (1927-1993) who was a nationally respected voice for social justice. 

April

April 2-May 2 

  • Ramadan (Islamic) - A holy month of fasting that begins and ends with the appearance of the new moon and commemorates the night God revealed the Qur’an to Prophet Muhammad.  Ramadan is an Islamic Holy month. 

April 5 

  • Qingming Festival (Chinese heritage) - A festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Day, to honor one’s ancestors. 

April 6 

  • National Tartan Day (National observance) - A day to recognize the contributions to the U.S. made by Scottish American. 

April 8 

  • National Day of Silence (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A student-led day-long vow of silence to protest the silencing of LGBTQ students. 

April 10 

  • Palm Sunday (Christianity) - The sixth Sunday of Lent and the last Sunday before Easter when Christians commemorate Jesus’s entry into Jerusalem. 
  • Rama Navami (Hinduism) -A spring festival commemorating the birth of Lord Rama, considered the seventh incarnation of Lord Vishnu. 

April 14 

  • End date of Lent (Christianity) - Lent is the Christian season of spiritual preparation before Easter, beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Holy Thursday. 
  • Holy Thursday (Christianity) - A celebration the Thursday before Easter commemorating the Last Supper with Jesus and the Apostles. 

April 15 

  • Good Friday (Christianity) - The Friday before Easter in which Christians commemorate the crucifixion of Jesus. 

April 15-April 23 

  • Passover (Judaism) - A celebration of freedom commemorating the release of Hebrew slaves in Egypt. Passover includes several Jewish holy days and begins at sundown on April 15. 

April 16 

  • Hanuman Jayanti (Hinduism) - A festival celebrating the birth of Lord Hanuman.  
  • Theravada New Year (Buddhist) - A 3-day Buddhist new year festival celebrated by followers of Theravada beginning on the first full-moon day in April. 

April 17 

  • Easter Sunday (Christianity) - A celebration of the resurrection of Jesus on the third day after his crucifixion. 

April 18 

  • Patriots' Day (Maine observance) - commemorates the first battles of the American Revolutionary War. 

April 21-May 2 

  • Ridvan Festival (Bahá’I) - A 12-day festival commemorating the days Bahá’u’lláh spent in the Garden of Ridvan and announced his mission as God’s messenger. The first day (April 21), ninth day (April 29) and twelfth day (May 2) of Ridvan are holy days and begin at sundown on April 20, April 26 and May 1 respectively. 

April 27 

  • Yom HaShoah (Judaism) - Also known as Holocaust Remembrance Day, a day of commemoration for the six million Jews who perished in the Nazi Holocaust. Yom HaShoah begins at sundown on April 27 and ends at sundown on April 28. 

April 29 

  • Laylat al-Qadr (Islamic) - Also known as the Night of Power, it is recognized as the night the first verses of the Holy Qur’an were revealed to the Prophet Muhammad. 

May

May 1-31 

  • Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (National observance) - Celebrates the contributions and culture of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. 
  • Jewish American Heritage Month (National observance) - An annual recognition of the achievements and contributions of Jewish Americans in the United States. 

May 1 

  • Beltane (Pagan/Wiccan) - Beltane, the Gaelic May Day festival, is a celebration that falls midway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. 

May 2 

  • End of Ridvan Festival (Bahá’I) - A 12-day festival commemorating the days Bahá’u’lláh spent in the Garden of Ridvan and announced his mission as God’s messenger. The first day (April 21), ninth day (April 29) and twelfth day (May 2) of Ridvan are holy days and begin at sundown on April 20, April 26 and May 1 respectively. 
  • End of Ramadan (Islamic) - A holy month of fasting that begins and ends with the appearance of the new moon and commemorates the night God revealed the Qur’an to Prophet Muhammad. Ramadan is an Islamic holy month. 
  • Eid ul-Fitr (Islamic) - A festival marking the end of the holy month of Ramisadan. Eid ul-Fitr is an Islamic holy day. 

May 5 

  • Cinco de Mayo (Mexican heritage) - Recognizes the date (1862) of the Mexican Army’s victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War. 

May 16 

  • Vesak Festival (Buddhist) - Also known as Buddha Day, the festival celebrates the three major events of Buddha’s life: birth, Enlightenment and death. 

May 18 

  • Lag BaOmer (Judaism) - A day recognizing the anniversary of the death of Rabbi Shimon in the 2nd century. It also marks the end of a plague that killed Rabbi Akiva’s 24,000 disciples. Lag BaOmer begins at sundown on May 18 and ends at sundown on May 19. 

May 24 

  • Declaration of the Bab (Bahá’I) - Commemoration of May 23, 1844 when the Bab announced he was the Herald of a new Messenger of God.  Declaration of the Bab is a Bahá'i holy day and begins at sundown on May 22. 

May 26 

  • Ascension Day (Christianity) - Also known as the Feast of Ascension, celebrating the day Jesus ascended into heaven, occurring on the Thursday 40 days after Easter. 

May 29 

  • Ascension of Bahá’u’lláh (Bahá’I) -An observance of the anniversary of the death of Bahá’i founder Bahá’u’lláh. Ascension of Bahá’u’lláh is a Bahá'i holy day and begins at sundown on May 28. 

May 30 

  • Memorial Day (National observance) - A federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. 

June

June 1-30 

  • LGBTQ+ Pride Month (LGBTQ+ national observance) - Commemorates the anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion in New York City on June 28, 1969, considered to be the birth of the LGBTQ+ movement. 

June 3 

  • Dragon Boat Festival (Chinese heritage) - Commemorates the death of Qu Yuan, a Chinese poet and minister known for his patriotism and contributions to classical poetry. 

June 4-6 

  • Shavuot (Judaism) - Commemorates the day God gave the Torah to the Jewish people at Mount Sinai. Shavuot is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on June 4 and ends at sundown on June 6. 

June 5 

  • Pentecost (Christianity) -A festival celebrating the descent of the Holy Spirit on the Apostles and marks the beginning of the Christian church. 

June 12 

  • Loving Day (National observance) - An annual celebration that commemorates the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia which struck down the remaining anti-miscegenation laws in the United States. 
  • Race Unity Day (Bahá’I) - Established as a day to promote racial harmony and understanding. 

June 19 

  • Juneteenth (National observance) - The oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. 

June 24 

  • Litha (Pagan/Wiccan) - Marks the first day of summer solstice. 

 

2022-2023 School Year
2022
August

August 13-15 

  • Obon (Buddhist) - An annual three-day festival honoring one’s ancestors. (Depending on the region, Obon may be observed July 13-15.) 

August 18-19 

  • Krishna Janmashtami (Hinduism) - A celebration of the anniversary of the birth of Lord Krishna. Krishna Janmashtami begins at sundown on August 18. 

August 26 

  • Women’s Equality Day (National observance) - A day commemorating the passage of the 19th Amendment and the continued work of women toward full equality. 

August 31 

  • Ganesh Chaturthi (Hinduism) - A festival celebrating the birth anniversary of Lord Ganesha. 

September 4-5 

  • Yom Kippur (Judaism) - The holiest day of the year in Judaism known as Day of Atonement. Yom Kippur is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on September 4. 

September 5 

  • Labor Day (National observance) - Created by the labor movement to honor the social and economic achievements of American workers. 

September 10 

  • Mid-Autumn Festival (Chinese heritage) - A celebration of hard work and harvest, as well as time for families to reunite. 

September 15-October 15 

  • Hispanic Heritage Month (National observance) - A month to pay tribute to the contributions of the Latino and Hispanic communities, and highlighting their diversity, culture and traditions. 

September 16 

  • Día de la Independencia (Mexican heritage) - Mexico celebrates its independence from Spain.  

September 20-24 

  • National Deaf Awareness Week (National observance) - Promoting awareness of the deaf and hard of hearing community and its culture and heritage. 

September 21-29 

  • Mabon (Pagan/Wiccan) - Occurring at the autumn equinox, it is a time of gratitude and sharing with others. 

September 25-27 

  • Rosh Hashanah (Judaism) - The first High Holiday signifying the beginning of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashanah is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on September 25. 

September 26-October 5 

  • Navaratri (Hinduism) - A festival celebrated over nine nights near harvest time when the nine forms of Goddess Durga are worshipped. 

October

October 1-31 

  • Disability Employment Awareness Month (National observance) - A national campaign that raises awareness of employment issues for people with disabilities and celebrates the contributions of America’s workers with disabilities. 
  • Italian American Heritage Month | National observance - Celebrates and honors the achievements and contributions of Italian immigrants and their descendants in the United States. 
  • LGBT History Month (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A time to bring awareness and recognize important moments in the history of lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender people. 

October 5 

  • Dussehra (Hinduism) - A festival symbolizing the victory of good over evil, commemorating the victory of Lord Rama over the demon Ravana. 

October 7-8 

  • Mawlid (Islamic) - A festival celebrating the birthday of Prophet Muhammad. Mawlid is an Islamic holy day and begins at sundown on October 7. 

October 9-16

  • Sukkot (Judaism) - A festival of giving thanks for the fall harvest and a commemoration of the 40 years of Jewish wandering in the desert after the giving of the Torah at Mt. Sinai. Sukkot is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on October 9.

October 10

  • Indigenous Peoples' Day – (national observance) - celebrates and honors Native American peoples and commemorates their histories and cultures 

October 11 

  • National Coming Out Day (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A national day to celebrate coming out and promote a safe world for LGBTQ individuals to live truthfully and openly. 

October 15 

  • End of Hispanic Heritage Month (National observance) - A month to pay tribute to the generations of Hispanic Americans who have positively influenced and enriched our nation and society. 

October 16-17 

  • Shemini Atzeret (Judaism) - Shemini Atzeret means “the eighth day of assembly” and is celebrated on the 22nd day of the Hebrew month Tishrei, following directly after the seven-day celebration of Sukkot. Shemini Atzeret is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on October  16. 

October 17-18 

  • Simchat Torah (Judaism) - Simchat Torah means “Rejoicing in the Torah” and marks the completion of the annual cycle of weekly Torah readings. Simchat Torah is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on October 17. 

October 24 

  • Diwali (Hinduism) - A religious festival also known as Deepavali and the festival of lights signifying the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil and hope over despair. 

October 26 

  • Birth of the Bab (Bahá’I) - Observance of the anniversary of the 1819 birth of Siyyid, the Bab, prophet and forerunner of the Bahá’i faith. Birth of the Bab is a Bahá'i holy day. 

October 27 

  • Birth of Bahá’u’lláh (Bahá’I) - A holy day celebrating the birth of Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Bahá’i faith. Birth of Bahá’u’lláh is a Bahá'i holy day. 

October 31 

  • Reformation Day (Christian) - A day marking the beginning of the Protestant Reformation in 1517. 

October 31-Novemember 1 

  • Samhain (Pagan/Wiccan) - Samhain is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter. It occurs about halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. Samhain begins at sundown on October 31. 

November

November 1-30 

  • National Native American Indian Heritage Month (National observance) - National Native American Indian Heritage Month celebrates and recognizes the accomplishments of the peoples who were the original inhabitants, explorers and settlers of the United States. 

November 1 

  • All Saints Day (Christianity) - A commemoration of all the saints of the church, known and unknown, who have attained heaven. 

November 1-2 

  • Día De Los Muertos Day of the Dead (Mexican heritage) - A 2-day celebration when it is believed the passageway between the real world and the spirit world is open so deceased loved ones can visit. 

November 2 

  • All Souls Day (Christianity) - Commemoration of those who have died and are now in purgatory being made pure before entering the presence of God in Heaven. 

November 9 

  • Kristallnacht (Judaism) - The Night of Broken Glass commemorates the attacks against Jewish people throughout Germany and Austria in 1938. 

November 11 

  • Veterans Day (National observance) - A celebration of U.S. military veterans. 

November 16 

  • International Day for Tolerance (International observance) - Bringing public awareness to the dangers of intolerance and a commitment to promote tolerance and non-violence through education, science, culture and communication. 

November 20 

  • Transgender Day of Remembrance (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A day to honor the memory of transgender people who lost their lives because of anti-transgender violence. 

November 24 

  • Thanksgiving Day (National observance) - Commemorates the Pilgrims’ harvest feast in the autumn of 1621. It is considered by some to be a “national day of mourning” in recognition of the conquest of Native Americans by colonists. 

November 26 

  • Day of the Covenant (Bahá’I) - A festival commemorating Bahá’u’lláh’s appointment of his eldest son, ‘Abdul-Baha, as the Center of his Covenant.  Day of the Covenant is a Bahá'i holy day. 

November 30 

  • St. Andrew’s Day (Scottish observance) - A national holiday marking the beginning of Scotland as a nation. 

December

December 3 

  • International Day of Disabled Persons (International observance) - An observance promoting the rights and well-being and increasing the awareness of persons with disabilities in every aspect of political, social, economic and cultural life. 

December 8 

  • Bodhi Day (Buddhist) - Commemorates the day when Buddha, Siddhartha Guatama, attained enlightenment. 

December 10 

  • Human Rights Day (National observance) - On this day in 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 

December 18-26 

  • Chanukah (Judaism) - An eight-day holiday, also known as the Festival of Lights, commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem in 2nd century BCE. Chanukah begins at sundown on November 28. 

December 21 

  • Yule, Winter Solstice (Pagan/Wiccan) - Marks the first day of the winter season, the longest night and shortest day in the Northern Hemisphere. 

December 25 

  • Christmas (Christianity) - Commemorates the birth of Jesus. 

December 26-January 1

  • Kwanzaa (African American heritage) - A seven-day African American and pan-African holiday celebrating family, community and culture. 

2023
January

January 1

  • New Year’s Day (National observance) - The first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar. 
  • Shogatsu (Japanese heritage) - The official and cultural New Year’s Day in modern Japan. 
  • Solemnity of Mary (Christianity) - A day honoring Mary as the Mother of God. 

January 6 

  • Epiphany (Christianity) - Recognition of the manifestation of God to the world. 

January 7, 8, or 9 

  • Mahayana New Year (Buddhist) - Recognition of the new year which begins with the first full moon in January. As the date depends on seeing the moon, an exact date can not be provided until closer to the time. 

January 14 

  • Makar Sankranti (Hinduism) - Observed on the first day of the tenth solar month of the Hindu calendar when the sun moves from Dhanu Rashi (Sagittarius) to Makar Rashi (Capricorn). 

January 16 

  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr Day (National observance) - A day to honor the birthday (January 15th) and achievements of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 

January 22 

  • Lunar New Year (Chinese heritage) - The beginning of a new year on the lunar calendar, marking the end of winter and the beginning of spring. 2022 is the Year of the Tiger. 

January 26 

  • Vasant Panchami (Hinduism) - A festival marking the beginning of spring. 

February

February 1 

  • African American History Month (National observance) - A month-long celebration to honor generations of African Americans who struggled with adversity to achieve full citizenship in American society. 

February 2 

  • Imbolc (Pagan/Wiccan) - Based on Celtic tradition marking the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. 
  • Ash Wednesday (Christianity) - Marks the start of the season of Lent in Western Christianity. 
  • Lent (Christianity) - Lent is the Christian season of spiritual preparation before Easter, beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Holy Thursday. Lent ends on April 6. 

February 5 

  • Lantern Festival (Chinese heritage) - A spring festival marking the end of the Chinese New Year period. 

February 5-6 

  • Tu BiShvat (Judaism) - This day marks the beginning of the “new year” for trees when the earliest blooming trees emerge from their winter sleep and begin a new fruit-bearing cycle. Tu BiShvat begins at sundown on February 5.                   

February 18 

  • Maha Shivaratri (Hinduism) - Also known as the Great Night of Shiva, this festival is observed annually to honor Lord Shiva. 

March

March 1 

  • Irish American Heritage Month (National observance) - Recognition of the contributions of Irish Americans to our nation’s history. 
  • National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month (National observance) - A grassroots initiative to raise awareness of people with developmental disabilities. 
  • Women’s History Month (National observance) - A celebration of women’s contribution to history, culture and society. 

March 6-7 

  • Purim (Judaism) - Commemorates the day the Jewish people were saved from execution in ancient Persia. Purim begins on the evening of March 16 ends on the evening of March 6.      

March 8 

  • Holi (Hinduism) - A festival marking the end of winter and beginning of spring. Also known as the festival of colors and the festival of love. 

March 20 

  • Ostara (Pagan/Wiccan) - A festival celebrating the spring equinox. 
  • Naw-Ruz (Bahá’I) - A festival celebrating the Bahá’i new year and ending the annual 19-day fast. Naw-Ruz is a Bahá’i holy day. 

March 21 

  • International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (International observance) - A day of action to eliminate all forms of racial discrimination worldwide. 

March 22-April 21 

  • Ramadan (Islamic) - A holy month of fasting that begins and ends with the appearance of the new moon and commemorates the night God revealed the Qur’an to Prophet Muhammad.  Ramadan is an Islamic Holy month. 

March 30 

  • Rama Navami (Hinduism) -A spring festival commemorating the birth of Lord Rama, considered the seventh incarnation of Lord Vishnu. 

March 31 

  • Cesar Chavez Day (National observance) - Honors Mexican American farm worker, labor leader and activist Cesar Chavez (1927-1993) who was a nationally respected voice for social justice. 

April

April 2 

  • Palm Sunday (Christianity) - The sixth Sunday of Lent and the last Sunday before Easter when Christians commemorate Jesus’s entry into Jerusalem. 

April 5 

  • Qingming Festival (Chinese heritage) - A festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Day, to honor one’s ancestors. 

April 5-April 13 

  • Passover (Judaism) - A celebration of freedom commemorating the release of Hebrew slaves in Egypt. Passover includes several Jewish holy days and begins at sundown on April 5. 

April 6 

  • National Tartan Day (National observance) - A day to recognize the contributions to the U.S. made by Scottish American. 
  • End date of Lent (Christianity) - Lent is the Christian season of spiritual preparation before Easter, beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Holy Thursday. 
  • Holy Thursday (Christianity) - A celebration the Thursday before Easter commemorating the Last Supper with Jesus and the Apostles. 
  • Hanuman Jayanti (Hinduism) - A festival celebrating the birth of Lord Hanuman. 

April 6, 7, or 8 

  • Theravada New Year (Buddhist) - A 3-day Buddhist new year festival celebrated by followers of Theravada beginning on the first full-moon day in April. As the date depends on the sighting of the moon, an exact date can not be given until closer to the time. 

April 7 

  • Good Friday (Christianity) - The Friday before Easter in which Christians commemorate the crucifixion of Jesus. 

April 8 

  • Vesak Festival (Buddhist) - Also known as Buddha Day, the festival celebrates the three major events of Buddha’s life: birth, Enlightenment and death. 

April 9. 

  • Easter Sunday (Christianity) - A celebration of the resurrection of Jesus on the third day after his crucifixion. 

April 14 

  • National Day of Silence (LGBTQ+ national observance) - A student-led day-long vow of silence to protest the silencing of LGBTQ students. 

April 17 

  • Patriots' Day (Maine observance) - commemorates the first battles of the American Revolutionary War. 

April 17-18 

  • Yom HaShoah (Judaism) - Also known as Holocaust Remembrance Day, a day of commemoration for the six million Jews who perished in the Nazi Holocaust. Yom HaShoah begins at sundown on April 17 and ends at sundown on April 18. 

April 18 

  • Laylat al-Qadr (Islamic) - Also known as the Night of Power, it is recognized as the night the first verses of the Holy Qur’an were revealed to the Prophet Muhammad. 

April 21 

  • End of Ramadan (Islamic) - A holy month of fasting that begins and ends with the appearance of the new moon and commemorates the night God revealed the Qur’an to Prophet Muhammad. Ramadan is an Islamic holy month. 

April 21-22 

  • Eid ul-Fitr (Islamic) - A festival marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan. Eid ul-Fitr is an Islamic holy day. Eid ul-Fitr begins the evening of April 21.  

April 21-May 2 

  • Ridvan Festival (Bahá’I) - A 12-day festival commemorating the days Bahá’u’lláh spent in the Garden of Ridvan and announced his mission as God’s messenger. The first day (April 21), ninth day (April 29) and twelfth day (May 2) of Ridvan are holy days and begin at sundown on April 20, April 26 and May 1 respectively. 

May

May 1 

  • Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (National observance) - Celebrates the contributions and culture of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. 
  • Jewish American Heritage Month (National observance) - An annual recognition of the achievements and contributions of Jewish Americans in the United States. 
  • Beltane (Pagan/Wiccan) - Beltane, the Gaelic May Day festival, is a celebration that falls midway between the spring equinox and the summer solstice. 

May 2 

  • End of Ridvan Festival (Bahá’I) - A 12-day festival commemorating the days Bahá’u’lláh spent in the Garden of Ridvan and announced his mission as God’s messenger. The first day (April 21), ninth day (April 29) and twelfth day (May 2) of Ridvan are holy days and begin at sundown on April 20, April 26 and May 1 respectively. 

May 5 

  • Cinco de Mayo (Mexican heritage) - Recognizes the date (1862) of the Mexican Army’s victory over France at the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War. 

May 8-9 

  • Lag BaOmer (Judaism) - A day recognizing the anniversary of the death of Rabbi Shimon in the 2nd century. It also marks the end of a plague that killed Rabbi Akiva’s 24,000 disciples. Lag BaOmer begins at sundown on May 8 and ends at sundown on May 9. 

May 18 

  • Ascension Day (Christianity) - Also known as the Feast of Ascension, celebrating the day Jesus ascended into heaven, occurring on the Thursday 40 days after Easter. 

May 24 

  • Declaration of the Bab (Bahá’I) - Commemoration of May 23, 1844 when the Bab announced he was the Herald of a new Messenger of God.  Declaration of the Bab is a Bahá'i holy day. 

May 25-27 

  • Shavuot (Judaism) - Commemorates the day God gave the Torah to the Jewish people at Mount Sinai. Shavuot is a Jewish holy day and begins at sundown on May 25 and ends at sundown on May 27. 

May 28 

  • Pentecost (Christianity) -A festival celebrating the descent of the Holy Spirit on the Apostles and marks the beginning of the Christian church. 

May 29 

  • Ascension of Bahá’u’lláh (Bahá’I) -An observance of the anniversary of the death of Bahá’i founder Bahá’u’lláh. Ascension of Bahá’u’lláh is a Bahá'i holy day. 
  • Memorial Day (National observance) - A federal holiday observed on the last Monday in May honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. 

June

June 1 

  • LGBTQ+ Pride Month (LGBTQ+ national observance) - Commemorates the anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion in New York City on June 28, 1969, considered to be the birth of the LGBTQ+ movement. 

June 11 

  • Race Unity Day (Bahá’I) - Established as a day to promote racial harmony and understanding. 

June 12 

  • Loving Day (National observance) - An annual celebration that commemorates the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia which struck down the remaining anti-miscegenation laws in the United States. 

June 19 

  • Juneteenth (National observance) - The oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. 

June 22 

  • Dragon Boat Festival (Chinese heritage) - Commemorates the death of Qu Yuan, a Chinese poet and minister known for his patriotism and contributions to classical poetry. 

June 24 

  • Litha (Pagan/Wiccan) - Marks the first day of summer solstice.