Signs and Symptoms of Emerald Ash Borer Infestation

If you see these signs on ash trees, please take pictures and report your findings.

Click on images to enlarge

 

Woodpecker Activity "blonding"

Woodpeckers fleck the outer bark looking for EAB larvae and pupae, creating a "blonding" effect.

pileated woodpecker (photo by Rober Berry) woodpecker "blonding" light woodpecker "blonding" medium (photo by Jenn Forman Orth, MDAR) woodpecker activity (phot by Kenneth R. Law, USDA)

(photo credits, left to right: Robert Berry, ?, Jenn Forman Orth (MDAR), Kenneth R. Law (USDA)

 

S-Shaped Tunnels

EAB larvae feed in a serpentine pattern under the bark.

 

EAB larval tunneling (photo by John Obermeyer, Purdue University) EAB tunneling (photo by Eric R. Day, Virginia Polytechnic Institute) street tree infested firewood (photo by Mike Kelly, Flickr)

(photo credits, left to right: John Obermeyer (Purdue University), Eric R. Day (Virginia Polytechnic Institute), ?, Mike Kelly (Flickr)

 

D-Shaped Exit Holes

Emerging adult beetles make D-shaped holes to exit the tree.

 

D-shaped exit hole (photo by Cliff Sadof; Purdue University) D-shaped exit hole D-shaped exit holes (photo by Rebecca Hargrave, Cornell Cooperative Extension)

(photo credits, left to right: Cliff Sadof (Purdue University), ?, Rebecca Hargrave (Cornell Cooperative Extension)

 

 

Epicormic Shoots

Sprouts grow from roots and trunks in an abnormal way.

epicormic branching (photo by Leah Bauer, USDA Forest Service) epicormic branching (photo by Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University) epicormic branching (photo by Edward Czerwinski, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources) epicormic branching (photo by Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry)

(photo credits, left to right: Leah Bauer (USDA Forest Service), Daniel Herms (The Ohio State University), Edward Czerwinski (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources), Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry

 

Bark Splits and Crown Dieback

Larval feeding under the bark causes the bark to split; excessive feeding causes the crown to die.

bark splitting (photo by Michigan Department of Agriculture) bark split (photo by Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry) crown dieback (photo by Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University) crown decline (photo by Eric R. Day, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)

(photo credits, left to right: Michigan Department of Agriculture, Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources - Forestry, Daniel Herms (The Ohio State University), Eric R. Day (Virginia Polytechnic Institute)

 

 

Updated: February 22, 2018