Frequently Asked Questions


Over the years, we have received some questions that seem to come up often either to our regional offices, dispatch centers or in the field. We have compiled a list of frequently asked questions in hopes that you may find the answer to your question more quickly and see it in writing. If you do not see your question here, please give us a call at anytime. You may contact us at the nearest dispatch center or regional office located here.

1. Antlerless Deer Laws.
2. Apprentice Hunting Licenses.
3. Bear Hunting Permit Fact Sheet.
4. Biodegradable Lures.
5. Border Waters.
6. Chronic Wasting Disease: Maine?s Carcass Importation Rule.
7. Concealed Weapons Permits.
8. Crossbow Hunting License Fact Sheet.
9. Commercial Large Game Shooting Areas.
10. Daily Bag Limit on Fish.
11. Disabled Veteran Hunting Licenses and Lifetime Licenses for those over 70.
12. Discharging of Firearms Near Dwellings.
13. Drinking Alcohol in a Boat.
14. Driving Deer.
15. Fishing License Requirements.
16. Fly Fishing: Adding Weight.
17. Harvesting Snapping Turtles and/or Their Eggs.
18. Gift Game and Furbearers.
19. Measuring Foothold Traps.
20. Moose Hunting. What Weapons Can I Use to Hunt Moose?
21. Nuisance Wildlife ? Who can help me?Can I help myself?
22. Pellet Guns & Air Guns:
23. Posted Land.
24. Registering Snowmobiles at Racing Events.
25. Retrieving wounded or killed big game after hours.
26. Ride-Along with a Maine Game Warden.
27. Silencers.
28. Wanton Waste ? What Does It Mean?
29.
What are the legal requirements to operate a dual sport/on-off road dirt bike on an ATV trail?
30. Can drones be used to assist a person on the ground hunt Bear, Deer, or Moose?




1. Antlerless Deer Laws.

Antlerless Deer Permit Law Clarified

AUGUSTA -- The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife would like to inform people of some changes in the law concerning the issuance of antlerless deer permits.

During its last session, the Maine Legislature passed Public Law Chapter 492 that went into effect as an emergency law on March 12, 2008. The new law does change the way the Superpack Licenses will deal with antlerless deer permits. Superpack license holders still will be eligible for entry into the Superpack antlerless lottery and if chosen, which most holders will be, can then take one more antlerless deer during the other deer seasons.

This law reaffirms the original intent of establishing the expanded archery season, which was to allow hunters in areas that had no firearm discharge ordinances to take antlerless deer to help control deer populations in those areas. This season was not established to allow people to hunt for bucks and not take antlerless deer in the process.

The law reaffirmed that the Superpack license antlerless deer permits can only be issued in Districts that have over 5,000 permits issued, and at no time can the number of antlerless permits given to Superpack holders in those Districts be over 2.5 percent of the total permits in that District. This new law also increases the number of antlerless deer permits made available to landowners from 20 percent to 25 percent.

The Superpack license was enacted as part of the budget in 2005. When the Legislature revisited the license in 2006, and added the expanded archery permits, the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife had to make some interpretations as the law simply stated 3 deer during the special season (Expanded Archery) established in accordance with law. Our interpretation, lacking clear direction at the time, was to issue one buck permit and two antlerless deer permits, as this is what was available to other license holders.

After hearing from the hunting public, as well as staff, that perhaps the interpretation needed to be looked at, the Department asked the legislature what the intent was and Public Law Chapter 492 was enacted clarifying that the three permits issued for expanded archery were to be antlerless deer permits.

What has not changed is the fact that all other licensed deer hunters still will be limited to taking one deer. If those hunters do not receive an antlerless deer permit either in the landowner drawing or the regular antlerless deer permit drawing they will have to take a buck. But they can only take ONE deer. A Superpack License holder, however, if given an antlerless deer permit from the Superpack drawing, still will be able to take FIVE deer, and without the superpack antlerless deer permit still be able to take FOUR deer.

It should be noted that due to the severe winter this past year and amount of deer mortality that resulted from last winter the Department reduced the number of antlerless deer permits available statewide from 66,275 permits in 2007 to 51,125 permits for this year's season.

Finally Superpack license holders still will be allowed to take a buck in the expanded season, BUT they will have to purchase a buck tag to do so. That is consistent with the requirement that states that all regular archery license holders, that is folks who do not buy a Superpack license but want to participate in the expanded archery season, must buy a permit to take a buck for $32 and can only take one buck, and may purchase an unlimited number of antlerless deer permits for $12 each and take as many antlerless deer as they have permits.

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2. Apprentice Hunting Licenses.

a) A resident or nonresident who is 16 years of age or older and not a holder of a valid hunting license or junior hunting license may hold an apprentice hunter license.

b) A person may be issued an apprentice hunter license only once.

c) Alien hunters are not eligible for an apprentice hunter license.

d) An apprentice hunter license expires on December 31st.

e) A resident apprentice hunter license, which includes a bear hunting permit and a wild turkey hunting permit (both spring and fall), is $21 ($25 in 2010) plus a $2 agent fee.

f) A nonresident small game apprentice hunter license, which permits the hunting of all legal species except deer, bear, turkey, moose, raccoon and bobcat, is $67 ($74 in 2010) plus a $2 agent fee.

g) A nonresident big game apprentice hunter license, which permits the hunting of all legal species and includes a bear hunting permit (both regular and November) and a wild turkey hunting permit (both spring and fall), is $102 ($114 in 2010) plus a $2 agent fee.

h) A person who meets all the other criteria for obtaining an apprentice license can obtain an apprentice archery hunter license for $21 ($25 in 2010) (resident) or $62 ($74 in 2010) (nonresident) plus a $2 agent fee in either case.

i) A person who meets all the other criteria for obtaining an apprentice license can obtain an apprentice crossbow hunter license for $25 (resident) or $48 ($55 in 2010) (nonresident) plus a $2 agent fee in either case. In addition, in order to obtain an apprentice crossbow license, the person must also hold a valid big game license or an apprentice big game hunter license.

j) A holder of an apprentice hunter license may not hunt other than in the presence of a supervising person at least 18 years of age who holds a valid Maine hunting license. The supervisor must have held a valid hunting license for the prior five consecutive years to be qualified to supervise a holder of an apprentice license. A supervisor is responsible for ensuring that the holder of an apprentice license follows safe hunting protocol as well as all hunting laws. In the presence of means in visual and voice contact without the use of visual or audio enhancement devices, including binoculars and citizen band radios.

k) A person who holds a regular big game hunting license is eligible to obtain an apprentice archery hunter license or an apprentice crossbow hunter license if they meet all the other criteria to obtain an apprentice hunter license in those categories.

l) A person is eligible to act as a supervisor for an apprentice archery hunter or an apprentice crossbow hunter if they meet the supervisory requirements for that particular weapon type. For example, to act as a supervisor for an apprentice archery hunter, a person must be at least 18 years of age, hold a valid Maine archery license, and have held a valid archery license for the prior 5 consecutive years.

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3. Bear Hunting Permit Fact Sheet.

a) This permit is required for nonresident and alien hunters who wish to hunt for bear during the regular firearm season on deer.

b) The fee for the permit is $40 plus a $2 agent fee.

c) A person must posses a valid license to hunt big game to be eligible for the November Bear Hunting permit.

d) If a person already possesses a valid regular bear hunting permit (required for hunting bear outside of the firearm season on deer), they may also hunt for bear during the regular firearm season on deer on that permit.

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4. Biodegradable Lures.

The use of live, dead, or chemically preserved natural or organic bait or food is prohibited in artificial lures only waters. This rule is deliberately restrictive and does eliminate many forms of biodegradable lures/baits. There are also many other types of artificial lures, artificial flies, poppers, spinners, spoons, etc. The use of biodegradable worms would be legal in all general regulations waters. The intent of the media release regarding plastic baits is to educate the public regarding the harm it can cause to our fish population.

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5. Border Waters.

Can I fish a Border Water (Maine/ New Hampshire) with a New Hampshire license from a Maine shore?

Yes, you can. Please use the following links to learn more about Maine's Border Water Regulations with New Hampshire, New Brunswick, and Indian Territories.
Click Here

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6. Chronic Wasting Disease: Maine?s Carcass Importation Rule.

Maine's Carcass Importation Rule and Chronic Wasting Disease What this means for deer hunters

Since the fall of 2006, it has been illegal for hunters who harvest any cervid (members of the deer family including-deer, moose, caribou, or elk, in any state, province, or country to bring whole carcasses back into the state of Maine. This means hunters must have their animal processed outside of the state and can only bring back boned-out meat, hardened antlers, skull caps that have been cleaned free of brain and other tissues, capes and hides with no skull attached, and finished taxidermy mounts.

Why has Maine enacted this law?

The threat of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) being introduced into our deer herd is serious. Chronic Wasting Disease is a lethal disease that affects the nervous system of cervids and always leads to the death of the animal. An infected cervid can pass on the disease to other cervids. Deer are most likely to contract the disease because they are social, group together, and travel widely to feed, to mate, or to wintering areas. Therefore, the potential to transmit the disease over large areas is great. Deer with CWD that die will also infect the area where the carcass decays since the infected proteins (prions) that cause the disease may persist in the soil.

If Maine discovered CWD in the deer herd, our current deer management would have to change drastically. Measures would have to be taken to reduce the transmission of the disease to other deer, including the potential depopulation of local deer herds. These actions would potentially change hunter attitudes and tax the resources of the Inland Fisheries and Wildlife Department. It might reduce hunter participation and seriously affect our ability to manage deer populations. In addition, local economies could be deeply affected by these changes.

Because of these concerns, the department has taken the step of prohibiting carcass importation from out of state to reduce the potential of bringing in an infected animal. Due to the nature of the disease and its transmission, no state can be 100 percent confident that they are CWD-free. Proactive measures like this are the best defense we can take to reduce our chances of contracting CWD in Maine.

For hunters:
  • If you hunt out of state, we recommend planning ahead of time to have your animal processed in the state where it was harvested.
  • When transporting a carcass through the state proceed without undue delay using the most direct route through Maine to the final destination for the cervid carcass or parts.
  • All cervid carcasses or parts transported through Maine will be completely contained in a manner that is both leak-proof (bagged, wrapped or otherwise contained) and that prevents their expose to the environment.
  • If you bring a harvested cervid back from out of state, and you were not aware of the importation rule, you must contact your local Inland Fisheries and Wildlife District Warden to report the importation of the carcass.
  • You can call the IFW information line at 207-287-8000 for your District Warden?s phone number.


Transportation of Certain Wildlife and Fish into Maine from Outside of the State

A) Transportation of cervid carcasses and parts into Maine from other states, provinces, and countries.

To prevent the introduction of CWD into Maine and pursuant to12 MRSA Part 12, Chapter 903, Subchapter 2, §10103, 2. and § 10104. 1., it is illegal for hunters who travel to any other states and provinces to hunt deer, elk, caribou or moose to transport any carcass parts that pose a risk of containing CWD prions with the exception of New Hampshire, Quebec, New Brunswick and Newfoundland/Labrador.. Hunters may return to Maine only with boned-out meat, hardened antlers (with or without skull caps), hides without the head portion, and finished taxidermy mounts.  If still attached, skull caps should be cleaned free of brain and other tissues.

At this time, no state or province can claim to be free of CWD - - too little monitoring has been conducted to realistically evaluate CWD status. Accordingly, this regulation against importing potentially high-risk carcass parts applies to wild deer, caribou, moose or elk taken in any state and province outside Maine, (with the exception of New Hampshire, Quebec, New Brunswick and Newfoundland/Labrador) and to cervids killed in commercial hunting preserves everywhere.

The Commissioner may, pursuant to the statutory authority above, issue a permit to a person or institution for importing other cervid carcass parts into Maine for possession in Maine. The Commissioner may set special conditions on the permit to mitigate potential disease-related impacts.

This transportation restriction applies to both any cervid wild by nature and to any cervid killed in a commercial hunting preserve, taken in any state, province, or country outside of Maine.

Any person who imports into Maine any cervid carcass or parts described above and is notified that the animal has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease must report the test results to the Department within 72 hours of receiving the notification. In order to facilitate the proper disposal of any infected material, the Department may take into possession any imported carcass or carcass part of an animal if the animal has tested positively for Chronic Wasting Disease.

B) Transportation of cervid carcasses and parts through Maine to other states, provinces, and countries

It is legal for individuals to transport through the state of Maine cervid carcasses or parts destined for other states, provinces, and countries. Such transportation is to occur without undue delay and using the most reasonably direct route through Maine to the final destination for the cervid carcass or parts. All cervid carcasses or parts transported through Maine will be completely contained in a manner that is both leak-proof and that prevents their exposure to the environment.

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7. Concealed Weapons Permits.

Is it legal to possess a loaded firearm/handgun on my camping, fishing, or hiking trip (including Sundays) for protection purposes? Do I need any type of license or permit since I am not hunting?

A concealed weapon is a weapon which is not in plain sight. A handgun may be considered concealed whether it is loaded or not loaded. Carrying a concealed weapon in Maine is illegal, unless you posses a valid Maine concealed weapons permit. Concealed weapons permits are provided to persons for personal protection purposes.

Reference to Hunting: As our law book states, hunters and trappers are exempt while engaged in hunting and trapping. Therefore, hunters and trappers may carry a loaded handgun which is not in plain sight (i.e. under their jacket) so long as they are engaged in hunting and or trapping.

Regarding Motor Vehicles: A person is never allowed to have a loaded firearm in a motor vehicle, unless they posses a valid Maine concealed weapons permit. Even then, the intent of the firearm must be for personal protective reasons only. Therefore any firearms which are carried in motor vehicles need to be unloaded and in plain sight, or unloaded and secured in a remote area (i.e. the trunk) out of the immediate control of the occupants. If you have a valid Maine concealed weapons permit, you may posses a loaded, concealed firearm in your vehicle, but the purpose of that firearm must be for personal protective reasons.

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8. Crossbow Hunting License Fact Sheet.

a) To be eligible to purchase a crossbow hunting license, the customer must hold a valid license to hunt big game (either a big game hunting license or an archery license).

b) Customer must submit proof of having successfully completed an archery hunting education course and a crossbow hunting course or satisfactory evidence of having previously held an adult archery and crossbow hunting licenses in this State or any other state, province, or country in any year after 1979. When proof or evidence cannot be provided, the applicant may substitute a signed affidavit.

c) A resident or nonresident 10 years of age or older and less than 16 years of age may hunt with a crossbow if that person holds a valid junior hunting (no crossbow license required).

d) With a valid crossbow hunting license, a person may hunt bear with a crossbow during the open season on bear and may hunt deer with a crossbow during the open firearm season on deer.

e) Crossbow Hunting Courses (Click Here) are available from the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

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9. Commercial Large Game Shooting Areas.

Maine does currently allow canned hunts. They are referred to as Commercial Large Game Shooting Areas and they are regulated by the Maine Department of Agriculture. Click Here. They are not currently issuing additional permits, but a licensed area may sell it?s facility to a new owner provided they do not change the location.

The Department of Agriculture currently allows the following species to be hunted in the shooting areas: Elk, Red deer, Sitka deer, Fallow deer, Bison, and Boar. However, due to an Inland Fisheries and Wildlife rule passed several years ago to help combat Chronic Wasting Disease, there is currently a prohibition on the importation of cervids. Therefore, the only deer which are currently being hunted are those which are being raised in the State of Maine.

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10. Daily Bag Limit on Fish.

If I am on a fishing trip, can I catch my daily bag limit each day and take them all home with me so I can freeze them to eat later?

No. At no time can a person possess more than their daily bag limit of fish. Furthermore, the length of the fish cannot be altered (heads cannot be cut off) unless consumption is in the immediate future.

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11. Disabled Veteran Hunting Licenses and Lifetime Licenses for those over 70.

Regarding persons who hold a valid disabled veteran hunting license or persons who are 70 years of age or older who hold a valid lifetime hunting license. In these two cases, the hunting license itself includes all non-lottery hunting permits at no extra charge. Permits issued by lottery (Moose and Any-Deer) are not included. The holders of these licenses are not required to obtain complimentary permits?the hunting license itself includes these permits.

Current hunting permits included in the hunting license are muzzleloading, migratory waterfowl (they would still need the Federal permit), pheasant, spring turkey, bear, coyote night hunt, and fall turkey. In addition, if the person holds a valid lifetime archery license, the archery license would include expanded archery antlered and expanded archery antlerless permits.

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12. Discharging of Firearms Near Dwellings.

Even if a person is shooting further than the required 300 feet from a dwelling, they would not have the right to destroy private property (i.e. trees). Destruction of private property (i.e. shooting trees/property that belongs to another) may be a violation of the criminal mischief laws. Further, a person may not discharge a firearm in a manner that may endanger the lives of other people such as shooting over a body of water. In this instance, there would have to be someone on the body of water in the direction of the discharged bullet.

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13. Drinking Alcohol in a Boat.

Is it legal for passengers to be drinking alcohol while boating?

Maine law strictly prohibits those who are under the influence of alcohol and drugs from operating any watercraft including motorized and non-motorized watercraft as well as canoes and kayaks. The rivers, ponds, and lakes contained within the state are public places. A person is guilty of public drinking if the person drinks liquor in any public place within 200 feet of a notice posted conspicuously in the public place by the owner or authorized person that forbids drinking in the public place or after being forbidden to do so personally by a law enforcement officer, unless the person has been given permission to do so by the owner or authorized person.



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14. Driving Deer.

Title 12, Section 11453 (1) makes driving deer illegal in the State of Maine. The exception is that three people may hunt together (but not drive deer) as long as they do not use sound making devices. The original legislative bill (LD 971) found that the fish and wildlife committee had made an amendment to the original bill. The amendment is a s follows: Amended to allow 3 or fewer people to hunt together without being guilty of driving deer, provided that they do not use noise making devices. The intent of the exception is to allow 3 or fewer people to hunt together, but not the driving of deer.

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15. Fishing License Requirements.

a) Does a person need a fishing license if they are in a boat but they are not fishing?

No. A person does not need a fishing license in a boat that contains a fishing pole. The fishing equipment must be used for fishing in order for the person to be required to purchase a Maine fishing license.

b) Does a person need a fishing license to assist a child or handicap person with baiting hook, casting/retrieving, or releasing fish? Game wardens will use their discretion in circumstances such as this to determine if the person casting and retrieving is either assisting the person who is not capable of doing so or fishing for themselves.

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16. Fly Fishing: Adding Weight.

As long as the weight of the fly line is propelling the fly and can do so on it?s own, than a weight may be added to allow a quicker sink of the fly. The use of spinning gear would still be prohibited in fly-fishing only waters even if the person was using a fly with a weight attached.

Definitions:

Fly. A single-pointed hook dressed with feathers, hair, thread, tinsel, or any similar material to which no additional hook, spinner, spoon, or similar device is added.

Fly Fishing. Casting upon water and retrieving in a manner in which the weight of the fly line propels the fly. No more than three unbaited artificial flies individually attached to a line may be used. (NOTE: It is unlawful to troll a fly in waters restricted to fly fishing only).

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17. Harvesting Snapping Turtles and/or Their Eggs.

A person may take Snapping Turtles for personal use if they are killed immediately. A person may also take Snapping Turtle eggs for personal use/consumption. A person must obtain a wildlife possession permit to posses live Snapping Turtles. Title 12 states that bthe commissioner may issue permits and establish seasons for the commercial harvest of snapping Turtles. No permits are being issued for commercial harvest of Snapping Turtles.

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18. Gift Game and Furbearers.

No person shall hunt, trap, or have in his/her possession at any time more than the numerical limits of any given species of upland game or furbearing animal which are specifically set forth by regulation. This means that a person may give another their legally taken Grouse for example. The person who harvested the grouse must count the grouse as part of their daily bag limit. The person who received the grouse must count the Grouse as part of their possession limit (eight Grouse) and may not ever exceed that limit.

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19. Measuring Foothold Traps.

There have been a lot of questions about how to measure foothold traps to comply with the new rule in Wildlife Management Districts (Click Here) (WMD's) 1-11 (except WMD 7). The questions are whether to take the largest possible measurement (i.e. diagonally across a square-jawed trap, or along the frame axis) or a standard measurement.

The court settlement and rule were developed with Maine Trappers Association input to reflect the same measurement used by the manufacturers and in trapping supply houses. They always measure perpendicular to the frame directly crosswise across the pan inside of jaw to inside of jaw. These are (most times) the same measurements that trapping catalogs list and should make it easier for trappers to buy traps and easier to enforce. In the affected Wildlife Management Districts, this measurement must be 5 3/8 inches or less for all foothold trap sets.

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20. Moose Hunting. What Weapons Can I Use to Hunt Moose?

Legal Methods for Taking Moose Moose may be hunted with rifle, shotgun, handgun, muzzleloader, or bow and arrow. Shotguns using shot loads and .22 caliber rimfire firearms are prohibited. For other frequently asked questions pertaining to Moose Hunting, click here.
Click Here

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21. Nuisance Wildlife ? Who can help me?Can I help myself?

There is a fisher in my neighborhood eating everyone's cats. Can you come and remove it or can we shoot it?

There is a fox den in my back yard. Can you come and move them?

If you cannot get satisfaction with the information provided in the links below, please contact the nearest regional dispatch center or IF&W office listed on our home page.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife: Click Here

Massachusetts Audubon: Click Here

Wildlife Damage Management: Click Here

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22. Pellet Guns & Air Guns:

Is it legal to hunt small game with a pellet gun or air gun in Maine?

Yes.

Can a convicted felon use a bb gun/air rifle for hunting?

No. The definition of Firearm in title 12 laws includes pellet/ air guns. Laws that pertain to the use of firearms also apply to pellet/ air guns. Convicted felons are prohibited from possessing firearms unless specifically pardoned by the Governor of Maine or granted a permit by the Maine Department of Public Safety.

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23. Posted Land.

Title 17A, Section 402 outlines that landowners must post their land with signs no more than one-hundred feet apart, and the signs must identify the activity that is prohibited. Landowners may post their land in a manner reasonably likely to come to the attention of an intruder. If you plan to post your property, put the signs high enough out of the reach of the average person. You may also you a paint system. One vertical purple stripe at least one inch in width and at least 8 inches in length placed on trees, posts or stones between three and five feet off the ground means Access By Permission Only. These stripes should be no more than 100 feet apart and the paint markings must be maintained so as to be conspicuous at all times.

You may also verbally express to persons that they are not allowed on your property. A verbal notice or the presence of signs constitutes a warning not to trespass. If a hunter is convicted of trespass on posted property, he/she will loose the privilege to hunt for a period of one year and possibly forfeit their firearm to public auction.

If you happen to confront persons on your property, you or the representative of the property has a right to see their hunting license to determine their name and address. If they refuse, it is a violation of state law.

If you have roads that surround your property, you must post the road to make it clear that no one is permitted, such as a sign on a gate that states ?No Motorized Vehicles, Foot Traffic Only, or any other activity you wish to control.

As a landowner, whether your property is posted or not, you have no duty of care to keep the premises safe for entry or use by others for recreational activities. Exceptions: As long as you do not willfully or maliciously fail to guard or warn against a dangerous condition, use, structure, or activity.

If you encounter a situation where a hunter states he/she wounded a deer and it ran onto your posted property, it gives them no right to trespass. In this instance, we recommend calling the nearest dispatch center and requesting to speak to a Game Warden. It is your choice to allow them onto your property or not. Most landowners request that a Game Warden accompany the hunter to help ensure the animal is located and does not go to waste.

We frequently are asked if landowners can hunt on their own property if they have it posted ?No Trespassing.? Yes, landowners have every right to hunt on their posted land so long as they abide by the same rules and regulations as any other sportsperson.

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24. Registering Snowmobiles at Racing Events.

a) Does any snowmobile need to be licensed or registered to compete or attend an organized and valid permitted event in Maine on private land, providing the snowmobile is transported to the event and not ridden in by trail?

Answer: Pursuant to MSA 12, 13112, snowmobiles are exempt from the registration requirement when operated at a prearranged racing meet whose sponsor has obtained a permit from the Commissioner of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife to hold such a meet. This applies to the time when the meet is in operation and at pre-race practices at the meet location.

b) Does any snowmobile need to be registered to compete or attend any organized event if that event does not have a permit from the State of Maine?

Answer: The only events described in law that exempt snowmobiles from the registration requirement are those events whose sponsor has obtained a permit from the State (as described above). Therefore, all snowmobiles competing in or attending an event that does not have a permit would be required to have a valid and current registration.

c) Does any snowmobile need to be licensed or registered to compete or attend any organized event if that event is on public land or a body of water?

Answer: The location of the event has nothing to do with the legal requirement to register a snowmobile in the context of this question. The registration requirement and exemption depend on whether or not the race meet?s sponsor has obtained a permit from the Department or not. If the race meet were permitted then the snowmobiles operated in the meet would not need to be registered. If the event was not permitted then the snowmobiles involved would all need to be registered.

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25. Retrieving wounded or killed big game after hours.

A person licensed to guide hunters whose client, during a guided hunt, wounds or kills a bear, deer, or moose may track and dispatch that animal outside of legal hunting hours.

All other situations require that a Game Warden be called prior to the killing of a wounded animal outside of legal hunting hours.

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26. Ride-Along with a Maine Game Warden.

Whom do I contact if I want to do a ride along with a Game Warden?

We accept 'ride-alongs' or 'job shadowing' with those who are at least eighteen years of age. You may contact a Game Warden at the nearest dispatch center or regional office found here.

You may also want to talk with a Maine Game Warden Recruiter. We encourage you to spend some time with us and consider a career as a Maine Game Warden.

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27. Silencers.

What are the regulations surrounding the use of suppressors/silencers for hunting in Maine?

Maine law states a person may not use for hunting or possess for hunting any firearm fitted or contrived with a device for deadening the sound of an explosion. This does not apply to: (1) Military organizations authorized by law to bear arms or to the National Guard in the performance of its duty.

For questions regarding general possession of Suppressors / Silencers, you should contact the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms.
Click Here

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28. Wanton Waste, What Does It Mean?

This provision of law applies to the concept of failing to retrieve an animal that has been wounded or killed in the field only.

At this time, Wanton Waste does not apply to persons who bring home game and then throw it out later. Additionally, this provision does not currently apply to fish.

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29. What are the legal requirements to operate a dual sport/on-off road dirt bike on an ATV trail?

Currently, there is no statute that would prohibit a properly registered dual sport motorcycle from operating on an ATV trail UNLESS the landowner does not want them operating on their land.  Then, after a proper warning/notice, they could be summonsed for T17-A criminal trespass or T12 civil trespass.

Example:  The operator of a dual sport motorcycle operating on an ATV trail and it is NOT registered as an ATV or a motorcycle could be summonsed for operating an unregistered ATV.  That same operator could be summonsed for operating an unregistered motor vehicle if operating on a road.  As stated above, if the dual sport motorcycle is registered as a motorcycle then they could be summonsed for trespassing.

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30. Can drones be used to assist a person on the ground hunt Bear, Deer, or Moose?

No. Title 12 Section 11216 prohibits the use of aircraft to assist a person on the ground in hunting Bear, Deer, or Moose, and Title 12 Section 10001(1) defines an aircraft as “ a machine or device designed for flight.” Radio controlled helicopters and airplanes are machines or devices that are designed for flight and, therefore, are aircraft as defined in statute.

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