Maine's families and living arrangements

November 12, 2009

The Maine State Data Center has compiled a report detailing the dramatic changes in Maine's households over the past few decades. These changes have profound implications for the way Maine people interact, live, and solve problems together. These also present an opportunity to create public policies that encourage denser, more efficient land-use planning.

Smaller families and households, and a smaller proportion of households with children are contributing to a changing Maine. As communities become less dense, the way we view and use our land and open space changes. It puts a premium on space for housing development. Likewise, as open public space becomes scarcer, its importance is highlighted and the trade-off between development and conservation is accentuated.

A spreading-out of our population also creates the need to build and maintain further-reaching infrastructure including roads and public water. Municipalities are burdened with higher costs to maintain adequate services, putting pressure on property tax payers to support this growth.

Finally, the nature of our communities is affected. Fewer families and more people living alone have profound implications to the way Maine people interact, live, and solve problems together. This challenge presents both a need and an opportunity to create public policies that encourage denser, more efficient land-use planning.

You can view the full PDF report from the link below.

The Maine State Data Center has compiled a report detailing the dramatic changes in Maine's households over the past few decades. These changes have profound implications for the way Maine people interact, live, and solve problems together. These also present an opportunity to create public policies that encourage denser, more efficient land-use planning.

Supporting documents

Maine Families and Living Arrangements (PDF)