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Bureau of Building Codes & Standards

LEGISLATION FROM THE 125TH LEGISLATURE

LD 1416 - "An Act to Provide Options to Municipalities Concerning the MUBEC"

This bill requires the Technical Building Codes and Standards Board to adopt, amend and maintain an individual uniform statewide Building Code and a separate uniform statewide Energy Code that municipalities up to 4,000 residents may choose to adopt.

If a municipality under 4,000 residents chooses to adopt a Building Code or an Energy Code, it must adopt the statewide version adopted by the Technical Building Codes and Standards Board, or it may adopt the entire Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code.

A municipality under 4,000 residents may choose to have no code. Current law states that towns under 2,000 do not have to enforce the MUBEC, which as of September 28, 2011 will state that towns under 4,000 residents may choose to adopt code(s) or to not have a code. Until then, the current statewide adopted MUBEC is in place. These population numbers are based on the 2010 census.

Towns over 4,000 in population will still have the MUBEC in place and no adoption is required as it was already done effective 12/1/2010.

 

LD 1253 - "An Act to Amend the Laws Governing the Enforcement of Statewide Uniform Building Codes"

This was signed into law by the Governor on 6/16/2011, as an emergency measure, which means it is effective immediately.


1. It amends the list of exceptions (that do not have to adhere to the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code) to now include crop storage buildings (warehouses or silos used to store harvested crops i.e. potato barns);


2. It amends the laws governing the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code to provide that the requirements of the 2009 edition of the International Energy Conservation Code within the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code do not apply to seasonally restricted cottages, but only until June 15, 2012;

3. It requires the Department of Public Safety, Technical Building Codes and Standards Board to adopt the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) standards within the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code for residential basement wall insulation (only);


**4. It clarifies that a certificate of occupancy demonstrating compliance with the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code is required only of buildings located in municipalities with more than 2,000 inhabitants in accordance with the required enforcement and inspection options; and


5. It removes the provision of the bill that requires the Technical Building Codes and Standards Board to determine where and under what circumstances the radon and internal air quality building codes should be applied.

**4 will be changed to 4,000 inhabitants with a clean-up bill that will occur in the next session of the language that is in different statutes and needs to be changed to be consistent. For now, it requires Certificates of Occupancy in municipalities of 2,000 and more population.