Financial Literacy

Maine-Based Resources

  • Finance Authority of Maine. Provides students and teachers with a variety of web-based resources on topics such as budgeting, credit, money management and savings along with Maine-based financial education resources. Resources include a Financial Education Services tool to find local financial education resources, including course information, programs, and speakers. 
  • Financial Fitness Fairs. The Maine Credit Union League provides a Money Management Experience, geared toward high school juniors and seniors, in which students participate in a simulation, similar to the game of “LIFE.” This on-site opportunity is available throughout Maine.
  • Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy. The Jump$tart Maine site has a multitude of helpful links, including an online library of financial education resources, best practices and a downloadable version of the National Standards in K-12 Personal Finance Education.
  • Junior Achievement of Maine. Offers innovative programs to educate students in grades K-12 about entrepreneurship, work readiness and financial literacy. Junior Achievement volunteers, with a variety of backgrounds, are available to visit classrooms.
  • Maine Office of Securities. Provides several brochures, investor tools and education resources available for download.
  • Maine Office of the State Treasurer. Check out the TeachME Financial Literacy page of the Maine Treasurer’s site for a list of some resources and links about personal money management, saving and investing, budget and debt management.

Web-Based Resources

  • CARE ProgramCredit Abuse Resistance Education (CARE) provides information, tools, and resources for high school students and educators. 
  • Consumer Action Handbook. Provides advice and consumer tips on such topics as cars, shopping from home, avoiding consumer and investment fraud, home improvement and financing, and credit cards. Also included is contact information for thousands of national consumer organizations, better business bureaus, corporations, trade associations, state and local consumer protection offices, state agencies, military consumer offices and federal agencies.
  • Council for Economic Education. Links to hundreds of lessons related to financial literacy. The council is a nationwide network that aims to help students develop the real-life skills needed for success as responsible consumers, savers, investors, citizens and workers.
  • EconEdLink. Offers hundreds of economic and personal finance lessons and resources and interactive tools for all grade levels. The site also includes professional development resources for educators.
  • EverFi:  EverFi teams with local corporations and foundations to provide learning platforms to K-12 school at no cost.  Among the platforms:  Financial Literacy (High School); Commons – Digital Town Square (Middle/High School); and Vault – Understanding Money (Elementary/Middle School).  If you would like to schedule a web demo to learn more about any of these platforms and set up an account, contact Steve Sandak at steve@everfi.com
  • Federal Reserve. The Classroom Resources tab links to lesson plans, activities, videos and materials. The resources are searchable by grade level or topics, including: personal finance, banking, money and monetary policy.
  • Federal Reserve Bank of Boston:  Programs, information, tools, and resources on a variety of topics are available on the site. 
  • Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. Provides websites, books and newsletters about dozens of topics, including economics, economic trends, the Federal Reserve system, U.S. monetary policy, great economists and personal finance.
  • Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis:  The site hosts a variety of resources and tools for all levels.  The “Piggy Bank Primer” provides younger students with short lessons on basic economic concepts.  FRASER, the Federal Reserve Archive, is a digital library covering the economic history of the United States, searchable by topics, titles, and timeline.  Econ Lowdown Online Learning offers online courses for students at all levels.
  • FinLitTv. This financial literacy site uses social media to work through financial questions. Students share their experiences in video messages, called FLiCs (a financial literacy clip). The site is geared toward college students, yet the well-vetted FLiCs are appropriate for high school students, too.
  • FINRA Foundation. In collaboration with the Consumer Federation of America and Channel One, FINRA launched Generation Money to help teach secondary school students about the power of compounding interest and other important financial lessons.
  • FoolProof Real Consumer Education. The site provides free interactive modules, designed to be used in succession for a complete curriculum, or used individually. Included are 10 new supplemental modules that explore topics such as Renting a Pad, Charitable Giving and Gambling.
  • Generation Money. A multimedia website featuring online financial education games, surveys and many other resources.
  • Money as You Grow. Provides “20 things kids need to know to live financially smart lives” through age-appropriate financial lessons and corresponding activities. Milestone posters are also available for download. Money as You Learn is a companion site to Money as You Grow and provides additional lessons and  tools for educators.
  • Money Smart. This financial education program helps youth (ages 12-20) and adults (in seven languages) learn the basics of handling their money and finances. Topics include setting financial goals, saving money, choosing a checking account, making a credit card work for you, paying for college and cars, making decisions about apartments and mortgages and more. A computer-based version and podcasts are available. 
  • Money Smart for Youth:   The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation offers free curriculum  products for young adults and elementary school students.
  • MyMoney.gov. The U.S. government provides this website dedicated to teaching all Americans the basics about financial education. Whether you're buying a home, balancing your checkbook or investing in your 401k, MyMoney.gov may help you do it better. Throughout the site, you'll see important information from 20 federal agencies. Find out if you have "financial smarts" by taking the MyMoney interactive quiz.
  • National Endowment for Financial Education. The site provides a variety of online and traditional resources, including a free High School Financial Planning Program supported by the University of Maine Cooperative Extension.
  • Practical Money Skills for Life. Includes lesson plans, games and calculators for such topics as “How Much Will My Loan Cost?” and “Researching and Buying a Car.”
  • Start Smart: Money Management for Teens. Suggests ways for teenagers to save and earn money, decide where to keep it, spend it wisely, protect against identity theft, be charitable and seek help about money matters. Take an online quiz to find out what you know about managing your money.
  • TeenDollars. Created by Ohio teacher Brian Page and his high school students, this site houses a teacher section with lesson plans, resource links and student-created materials. A list of online personal finance games is available under the “For Students” tab.
  • TreasuryDirect. Created by the U.S. Department of the Treasury Bureau of the Public Debt, this site offers videos, games and money math lessons intended to be used as curriculum supplements.
  • Understanding Taxes. The Internal Revenue Service provides lessons and resources for an interactive tax education program that can be integrated into existing curricula.