Annual Guidelines

The following guidelines are for the Gifted and Talented Program Application, Budget, Academic Plan and Visual and Performing Arts Plan.

Gifted and Talented Application 2013-14 for School Administrative Units (SAUs)

Note: New SAUs and SAUs that did not have approved plans in 2012-13 must only complete Section V and VI (including submission of budget to Maine Education Data Management System [MEDMS] Financial) of the annual application and include these sections with submission of Visual & Performing Arts and Academic Plans. Read below for guidance.

Timeline for completing the application: 

  • The application is due Dec. 6, 2013.
  • All units will be notified of approval/non-approval status on the Maine DOE website.
  • In the event that a unit application is not approved, the unit will have 15 days to revise the application.

In order to complete the application process:

  • SAUs will complete the application document, sections I to VI.
  • The budget must be submitted to MEDMS Financial.
  • SAUs may access this form online.
  • When the application form is complete, please return the completed application to GT.DOE@maine.gov .
  • All applications must be submitted electronically.

Steps for completing the application :

I. Status of Program Implementation

Please check 1), 2) or 3). If the SAU is unsure of the status of its plan, please check with your superintendent. A copy of the plan and approval letter should be maintained in your file. If requesting a waiver, please complete the Gifted and Talented Educational Program Waiver Application.

IISummary of Academic and Visual/Performing Arts student growth data and program Evaluation

  • To report data based on achievement, collect scores in each academic area for which the students are identified in 2012-13 and compare scores from the beginning of the year to the end of the year in order to determine if the students showed growth, maintenance or decline. Data may be taken from, but not limited to, the following: NECAP, NWEA, MEA, DRA, SRI, achievement test scores, grades, performance assessments and local assessments. Whenever possible, achievement data should be presented in chart/graphic form. Report out growth with a "+," maintenance with a "*," and decline with a "-."

Small SAUs:

A sample data achievement report for a small SAU (25 identified gifted and talented students or fewer) should present results for each individual student. The following is an example of a report of the identified gifted and talented students’ achievement in reading:

Students

 RA

MEA
Reading

Report Card 
Grade in Reading

1

+3 levels

+ exceed

* maintain

2

+6 levels

* maintain

* maintain

3

+1 level

- meet

* maintain

4

     -----

* maintain

* maintain

We interpret the above chart to mean: Student one rose three levels in the DRA program, went up to the exceeds level on the MEA, and maintained his/her grade from the previous year.  Student two rose six levels in the DRA program, maintained the same MEA score from the year before, and maintained the same grade as the year before.  Student three rose one level in the DRA program, declined on the MEA to the “meets” category, and maintained the same grade as the year before.  Student four did not work in the DRA program because this student is a middle school student.  This student maintained the same MEA score and the same grade as compared to the previous year.

SAUs may use more or fewer data tools than the ones indicated in the sample above.  However, SAUs are required to use at least one data tool.

In the event that objective scores are not available, possible assessment tools may include but are not limited to:  performance assessment rubrics, grades, teacher behavioral checklists, observation checklists, etc. SAUs may report anecdotal information based on specific skills/objectives in a succinct manner.  Below is an example of a heterogeneous in class differentiation unit on Maine.  The second example demonstrates a targeted gifted and talented group engaging in an independent study.  These two examples demonstrate how to report growth when standardized tests are not available.

Example one: In-class differentiation unit: Maine


Pre-assessment

          Objectives

        Assessment

KWL  Chart

  • same objective as class
  • same objective as class
  • same objective as class
  • extension
  • extension

Product specific to the 5 
objectives listed

After the teacher evaluates the product noted in the assessment section, she/he will report as to whether the student(s) maintained the same level as the general class performance (refers to objectives 1-3), went beyond the class performance to some degree (refers to objectives 4-5), or exceeded the general class performance (refers to 4-5). 

In section II on the application, only report whether the student(s) went beyond to some degree or exceeded the classroom performance (see table below).

GT Students

   Goes beyond

Exceeds

1

Objective 1,2,3

Objective 4,5

2

 

 

Example two: Targeted gifted and talented group doing off grade level work in Maine Learning Results: Independent Study

       Pre-assessment

      Objectives

     Assessment

Student generated questions

  • complete a plan
  • determine product
  • determine audience
  • refine research questions
  • presentation skills
  • communication skills

Self selected product form demonstrating content knowledge, and quality of product and delivery.

In section II on the application, only report whether the student(s) were proficient or exemplary based on their rubric score (see table below).

GT Students

   Goes beyond

Exceeds

1

Objective 1,2,3

Objective 4,5,6

2

 

 

Moderate to large SAUs:

A sample data achievement report for a larger SAU (over 25 identified gifted and talented students) should present data in aggregate form.  The following is an example of a report in reading:

Grade
Levels

Percent
Students

   DRA

Percent
Students

MEA
Reading

K-2

100%

+10 levels

     NA

    NA

3-5

20%
50%
20%
10%

+8 levels
+7 levels
+5 level
*maintain

90%
5%
5%

* maintain
+ exceeds
- meets

6-8

   NA

    NA

80%
5%
15%

* maintain
+ exceeds
- meets

9-12

   NA

    NA

75%
5%
20%

* maintain
+ exceeds
- meets

 

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

We interpret the above chart to mean: On the DRA, 100% of the identified students in grades K-2 in reading rose ten levels in one year.  In grades 3-5, 20% of the identified students rose eight levels, 50% of the students rose seven levels, 20% of the students rose five levels and 10% of the students did not make any gains between the school year 2011-12 and 2012-13.  The middle school and high school students do not use the DRA.  In grades K-2 MEA scores are not available.  In grades 3-5, when comparing 2011-12 with 2012-13, 90% of identified students in reading maintained the same category, 5% moved up to the exceeds category, and 5% declined to the meets category.  The grades 6-8 and 9-12 are interpreted in the same way.

SAUs may use more or fewer data tools than the ones indicated in the sample above.  However, SAUs are required to use at least one data tool. In the event that objective scores are not available, possible assessment tools may include but are not limited to:  performance assessment rubrics, grades, teacher behavioral checklists, observation checklists, etc.

Below is an example of a heterogeneous in class differentiation unit on Maine.  The second example demonstrates a targeted gifted and talented group engaging in an independent study.  These two examples demonstrate how to report growth when standardized tests are not available.

Example one: In class differentiation unit:  Maine


Pre-assessment

          Objectives

        Assessment

KWL  Chart

  • same objective as class
  • same objective as class
  • same objective as class
  • extension
  • extension

Product specific to the 5  
objectives listed

     
After the teacher evaluates the product noted in the assessment section, she/he will report as to whether the student(s) maintained the same level as the general class performance (refers to objectives 1-3), went beyond the class performance to some degree (refers to objectives 4-5), or exceeded the general class performance (refers to objectives 4-5).   

In section II on the application, only report whether the student(s) went beyond to some degree or exceeded the classroom performance (see table below).

GT Students

   Goes beyond

Exceeds

30%

Objective 1,2,3

Objective 4,5

70%

Objective 1

Objective 2-5

Example two:  Targeted gifted and talented group based on off grade level Maine Learning Results:  Independent Study

       Pre-assessment

      Objectives

     Assessment

Student generated questions

  • complete a plan
  • determine product
  • determine audience
  • refine research questions
  • presentation skills
  • communication skills

Self selected product form demonstrating content knowledge, and quality of product and delivery.

In section II on the application, only report whether the student(s) were proficient or exemplary based on their rubric score (see table below).

GT Students

Proficient

Exemplary

10%

Objective 1,2,3

Objective 4,5,6

90%

Objective 1

Objective 2-6

 

 

 

1.1 The overall percentages of student growth, maintenance or decline in each academic area according to grade span may be reported out using a table.

1.2 Draw conclusions from the percentages in 1.1 to determine program effectiveness.  Please include any other factors, other than the 1.1 information, that affect the program.

2. If you have a fully implemented Visual and Performing Arts program (noted in section I Status of Program Implementation #1), then it is necessary to report achievement data.  Possible assessment tools may include but are not limited to:  check sheets, rubric assessments, critiques, grades, etc.  SAUs may report anecdotal information based on specific skills/objectives in a succinct manner.  Please refer to section II number 1 for examples of how to report achievement data when no standardized tests are available.  The first example is based on in class differentiation and the second example is based on independent study.  These examples are transferable throughout all content areas including the arts.

2.1 In order to draw conclusions from your data, look at the student growth tables and make generalizations.  What does the data tell you?

2.2 In addition to the student growth data, what other tools did you use to help you determine program effectiveness?  What information did you gather from these tools?

3. Please describe any new academic program goals by indicating what the goal is, who is responsible, a timeline, and how you will determine if the goals have been met.


Name the goal

Who is responsible

Time frame

Document the
goal has been met

Date met

 

 

4. Please describe any new arts program goals by indicating what the goal is, who is responsible, a timeline, and how you will determine if the goals have been met.

 

Name the goal

Who is responsible

Time frame

Document the
goal has been met

Date met

 

 

III. Changes 

Please note any significant changes in the approved academic and/or arts plans that are not goals, why the changes occurred, and the anticipated outcomes.

IV. Local Program(s) Identification Process for 2013-2014

Please complete numbers 1-8 in the application. 
1.  List the total number of students identified as Gifted and Talented in academics. This is approximately 3-5% of the total school population.
1.1 For example, the gifted and talented consultant confers with classroom teachers on students who excel in reading. 
2.  List the total number of students identified in Visual and Performing Arts.  This is approximately 3-5% of the total school population. 
2.1 For example, the gifted and talented consultant confers with the visual arts teacher on students who excel in visual arts.
3.  List the number of students in each academic area by grade level regardless of whether they are identified in the general intellectual area. Here we are looking for the services provided (this may be more than 3-5% of the total school population listed in number 1 because there may be duplicate counts).  Therefore, students may be counted more than once.  Indicate whether an identification process exists for subjects.
4.  List the number of students identified in three or more academic areas (general intellectual ability) by grade level regardless of the fact that you have noted them in number 3.  Students listed in number 5 may be duplicate students from those listed in number 4. 
5.  Please identify students that hold both a gifted and talented and special education label.  This would be noted on their IEP.  Do not include students with a 504 designation.
6.  Please indicate the number of males and females in the general population and indicate the number of gifted and talented males and females.

V. Program Personnel 

Please provide the following information on program personnel. 

In 1), please provide the following information:

A. Professional Staff

  • List the professional staff by name and for whom you are requesting subsidy. 
  • In the endorsement column, indicate whether this person is or is not gifted and talented endorsed or holds a transitional endorsement by writing yes or no. 
  • Indicate whether the person is working under a teacher or administrator contract.
  • Indicate the grade levels for which the person is responsible. 
  • Write the person’s title or role. 
  • If the person conducts secondary classes, indicate the number of identified gifted and talented students in the class.  The number should equal the total number of students in the class.
  • Indicate if this person is full-time or part-time for the Gifted and Talented program.

B. Auxiliary Staff

  • List the auxiliary staff by name and for whom you are requesting subsidy. 
  • State the name and position of supervisor.
  • In the endorsement column, indicate whether this person is or is not gifted and talented endorsed or holds a transitional endorsement by writing yes or no. 
  • Indicate the grade levels for which the person is responsible. 
  • Write the person’s title or role. 
  • If the person conducts secondary classes, indicate the number of identified gifted and talented students in the class. The number should equal the total number of students in the class.
  • Indicate if this person is full-time or part-time for the Gifted and Talented program.

C. Independent Contractors

  • List the independent contractors by name that works with students.
  • List the independent contractor by name that works with teachers and administrators.
  • In the endorsement column, indicate whether this person is or is not gifted and talented endorsed or holds a transitional endorsement by writing yes or no. 
  • Indicate the grade levels for which the person is responsible. 
  • Write the course title or consultant’s role. 
  • If the person conducts secondary classes, indicate the number of identified gifted and talented students in the class.
  • Indicate if this person is full-time or part-time for the Gifted and Talented program.

In 2), please write the number of personnel who are primarily responsible for carrying out the components of the Gifted and Talented program.  You do not have to indicate that classroom teachers are responsible for differentiation within the regular classroom.

VI. Program Budget for 2013-14 for all SAUs

In 1), please submit the annual budget per instructions.

1. Write professional staff member’s name and state elementary and/or secondary salary including benefits.  Write auxiliary staff member’s name and state elementary and/or secondary salary including benefits. Write independent contractor’s name and state elementary and/or secondary salary.

Professional Staff allowable costs:

  • The Administrator must hold administrative certification but does not have to have the gifted and talented endorsement.
  • The teacher of the gifted and talented must be endorsed or have a transitional endorsement as of November 30, 2013.
  • Teachers in the arts must be endorsed and work with only identified gifted and talented arts students in order to receive gifted and talented funding.  The percent of time spent with identified students is an allowable cost. Teachers in the arts may be the teacher for gifted and talented arts students if they are under the direct supervision of an endorsed teacher of the gifted and talented or an endorsed administrator; however, that portion of the arts teacher’s schedule is not an allowable cost if the teacher is not endorsed.

Auxiliary Staff allowable costs:

  • An educational technician must be endorsed or under the direct supervision of an endorsed teacher of the gifted and talented in order to receive funding.

Independent Contractors allowable costs:

  • A mentor must be under the direct supervision of an endorsed teacher of the gifted and talented or a certified administrator.
  • A tutor must be under the direct supervision of an endorsed teacher of the gifted and talented or a certified administrator.
  • A visiting artist must be under the direct supervision of an endorsed teacher of the gifted and talented or a certified administrator.  Only the portion of the time spent with only identified gifted and talented students are allowable. 

2A. List educational supplies and their costs.

Educational Supplies allowable costs

  • Books and supplemental materials for both the academic and visual and performing arts programs used to implement the gifted and talented program for identified students are an allowable cost.  These materials must be supplemental to what the regular program finances.  For example, a book is purchased for the identified gifted and talented students in order to supplement the textbook.  The textbook is not an allowable cost whereas the book is an allowable cost.  If a gifted and talented student uses pastels for an art project, this is not an allowable cost because all students use pastels.  If the identified student requires specialized materials for the art project, then this is an allowable cost.
  • Equipment is not an allowable cost.

2B. List approved other allowable costs.
Approved other allowable cost

  • Field trips are an allowable cost if the trip is a unique program to meet the needs of the identified gifted and talented students.  If all students at grade five are going on the field trip, then this is not an allowable cost.  If the field trip is an allowable cost, then the mileage, bus driver, and any admission fees are approvable.

2C. Student Tuition

  • A regional program is an allowable cost under this section.
  • Computer programs/courses for identified students such as Virtual High School, Aleks, Renzulli Learning are allowable costs.
  • If students have exhausted the curriculum options at their high school, students may take a course at the University.  The tuition reimbursement is limited to one course per student per semester. The course will be reimbursed at the state tuition level.

2D. Staff Tuition – Professional Development

  • The tuition of certified teachers or administrators to university level courses in gifted and talented education is allowed for personnel with direct administrative or instructional responsibility for the gifted and talented program.  The tuition reimbursement is limited to one course per person per semester.
  • The costs of staff development in gifted and talented education for professional staff are allowed if the staff development is conducted by a person from the field of gifted education who will specifically address the needs of gifted and talented students.  Staff development may include SAU or school in-service programs, training institutes, workshops, or conferences.
  • Registration fees for state, regional, or national Gifted and Talented conferences are allowable costs.

Note: Approved budgets will be posted on the Maine DOE’s Gifted and Talented Annual Budget Page.

The amount eligible for State subsidy under Essential Programs & Services’ Other Subsidizable Costs is the lesser of the (1) approved budget for the program and (2) the actual expenditures for the program.

Supplemental notes relating to the MEDMS report and the Gifted and Talented Application sections V and VI.

  • Any CSD, RSU, RSU/MSAD, or Municipal School Unit must submit one comprehensive budget.  An AOS or School Union must submit individual budgets for each member SAU. Amounts budgeted for the SAU’s Gifted and Talented Program (Program 4900) must be reported to Maine Education Data Management System (MEDMS) Financial system and should be included with the submission of the Annual Budget Reporting for your SAU:   http://www.maine.gov/education/forms/misteam/efm46/46menu.htm.
  • The budget submitted to MEDMS Financial should represent a combined budget for both the academic and visual and performing arts programs.
  • Please utilize the Model Chart of Accounts for appropriate Gifted and Talented account codes:  http://www.maine.gov/education/data/handbook/handbookmenu.htm.
  • Please work with your business office staff to ensure your budget data has been submitted to the Maine Education Data Management System (MEDMS) financial system.  The MEDMS financial system also allows your business office staff to print a Gifted and Talented report of the budget submission.  Following are the steps to print this report:
    • Log into MEDMS (local business personnel with appropriate access)
    • Under Application select “Financial” and click “Go”
    • Under Action select “View” and click “Go”
    • Under Menu select “Reports” and click “Go”
    • Under Sub-Menu select “Gifted and Talented Expenditure” and click “Go”
    • Under “Report Style” select “Detailed”
    • Under “Fiscal Year” select “2014” for 2013-2014 school year
    • Under “Budget/Actual” select “Budget”
    • Under “Report Format” select “Excel”
    • Click “Show Report”
    • A dialog box will pop up and ask if you want to open or save the file.  This creates an Excel file of the Gifted and Talented Budget for the SAU based on the budget submitted to the MEDMS financial system by your business personnel.

Gifted and Talented Academic and Visual and Performing Arts Plans 2013-14 for new SAUs and those SAUs that did not have approved plans in 2012-13

New SAUs and SAUs that did not have approved plans in 2012-13 must complete one academic plan and one visual and performing arts plan and Sections V and VI of the annual application (including budget submission to MEDMS Financial).

1. The gifted and talented academic and visual/performing arts plans must include a philosophy description for the gifted and talented program aligned with the regular SAU philosophy.

2. The program abstract for the academic and visual/performing arts plans should provide a general program description specific to the program delivery.  Be sure to include specifics for grade spans and content areas in both the academic and the arts.

3. The SAU should list three or four academic goals and three or four visual/performing arts goals.  The SAU must also list supporting objectives and appropriate activities for each goal.  The objectives should be aligned with the Common Core State Standards and the Maine Learning Results: Parameters for Essential Instruction (MLR).  This may be stated in chart or narrative form.

Name the MLR/CCSS

Goals

Objectives

Activities

Target Dates

4. The identification process will describe the new identification procedures that the newly formed RSU agrees upon in both the academic and visual/performing arts area.  This process will reflect how the SAU plans to identify new students beginning in 2013-14.  Three measures must be used to identify students in English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies.  Three measures must also be used to identify students in Visual Arts, Music, Drama, and Dance.  In the academic areas, at least one measure must be objective.  This is not the case in the arts.  It is recommended that criteria and rubrics are used in the arts as part of the identification process.

5. The identification process for general intellectual ability (identified in three or more academic areas) will include three measures one of which must be objective.  List the tools and process that are used in screening, selection and placement. The general intellectual ability identification process is only stated on the academic plan.

6. The identification process will describe the new identification procedures that the SAU agrees upon.  (This is number 5 on the arts plan).

  • Describe when and how the SAU will review the identification procedures and services.
  • List reasons for exiting the program and the procedures the SAU will follow when considering the removal of a student from the program.
  • Describe the procedure the SAU will follow if a parent, teacher, or student appeals the decision of the gifted and talented identification committee.
  • Describe the procedure the SAU will follow to identify a transfer student from another district or SAU.

7. List any workshops, conferences, book studies, etc. that apply toward the professional development of personnel responsible for gifted and talented services. (This is number 6 on the arts plan).

8. Describe the organizational structure of the gifted and talented academic and visual/performing arts programs.  An organizational structure may be described as a pull out program, cluster grouping, in class differentiation, mentoring, independent study, etc. This includes but is not limited to the roles and responsibilities of administrators and teachers. (This is number 7 on the arts plan).

9. Describe how you will know if the gifted and talented program is effective. This description should include:

  • To what degree the SAU has reached its targeted goals (the goals refer to #3 on the plans). 
  • To what degree the organizational structure is effective.
  • To what degree is the number of staff sufficient for your program design.

Please include both objective and subjective tools that you plan to use. (This is number 8 on the arts plan.)

For further clarification, contact the Maine DOE Gifted & Talented program.