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Endnotes

1“The Deadliest Drug: Maine’s Addiction to Alcohol,” The Portland Newspapers, Portland, ME. (Oct. 19-26, 1997).

2 “Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs: Potential Savings,” report by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD. (1996).

3 “Substance Abuse Prevention: Maine’s 1997 Prevention Data Report,” report by the Office of Substance Abuse, Maine Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services, Augusta, ME. (December 1997).

4 Milkman and Wanberg. (1997).

5 “Evaluating Recovery Services: The California Drug and Alcohol Treatment Assessment,” report by the California Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs and National Opinion Research Center, CA. (April 1994). Swartz, Lurigio, and Slomka, “The Impact of IMPACT: An Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Cook County Jail’s Substance Abuse Treatment Program,” Chicago, IL. (1994.) Join Together: “Fixing a Failing System: How the Criminal Justice System Should Work with Communities to Reduce Substance Abuse,” MO. (Feb. 1996).

6 “The Deadliest Drug”.

7 Census Data File STF3A, Table P57, 1990.

8 Office of Substance Abuse Data System.

9 Ibid.

10 Bureau of Justice Assistance in 1995.

11 Maine Communities Face Alcohol: The Deadliest Drug, 9/98.

12 “The Deadliest Drug”.

13 Ibid.

14 Ibid.

15 “Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs: Potential Savings,” report by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

16 "Past year heavy alcohol use” means 5 or more drinks for a man or 4 or more drinks for a woman in a 24-hour period at least once a week in the past year or 4 or more days in each month. “Past month heavy alcohol use” means 5 or more drinks for a man and 4 or more drinks for a woman in a 24-hour period or on 4 or more days in a month.

17 “Executive Summary, State of Maine Substance Abuse Treatment Needs Assessment: Alcohol and Other Drug Household Estimates Study,” report by the Office of Substance Abuse, Maine Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services, Augusta, ME. (1997).

18 “The Deadliest Drug”.

19 “Youth Risk Behavior Survey Report,” report by the Maine Department of Education, Augusta, ME. (1997).

20 “State Incentive Program,” proposal submitted to federal Center for Substance Abuse Prevention by the Office of Substance Abuse, Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services. (March 4, 1998).

21 Based on 1995 Population Estimates, Women Aged 18 and over.

22 Census Data File STF3A, Table P57, 1990.

23 “The Deadliest Drug”.

24 Ibid.

25 Ibid.

26 John J. DiJuilio, “Broken Bottles, Alcohol, Disorder and Crime.” (1996).

27 Milkman & Wanberg, 1997.

28 Greenwood & Deschenes, 1993.

29 See endnote 5.

30 “The Deadliest Drug”.

31 “Executive Summary, State of Maine Substance Abuse Treatment Needs Assessment: Alcohol and Other Drug Household Estimates Study.”

32 Kids Count Data Book, (Augusta, ME: Maine Children’s Alliance, 1997.

33 “The Deadliest Drug”.

34 Ibid.

35 “Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs: Potential Savings,” report by the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

36 Hawkins, Catalano, “Communities that Care.” Bernard, “Fostering Resiliency.” Lofquist, “New Designs for Youth Development .”

37 “State Incentive Program,” proposal submitted to federal Center for Substance Abuse Prevention by the Office of Substance Abuse.

38 “The Deadliest Drug”.

39 Hawkins, Catalano. Bernard. Lofquist.

40 Hawkins, Catalano.

41 “The Costs of Dropping Out of School and the Productivity Benefits of Returning and Graduating: A Survey of Iowa's Alternative School Graduates.” (Nov. 1990).

42 The Community School, Camden, ME.

43 According to the Office of the Chief Judge Maine District Court, Maine Department of Corrections, and Maine Office of Substance Abuse, providers are not generally available and accessible.

44 “The Deadliest Drug”.

45 Ibid.

46 “Executive Summary, State of Maine Substance Abuse Treatment Needs Assessment: Alcohol and Other Drug Household Estimates Study.”

47 Sing, Hill, Smoklin, Heiser, “The Costs and Effects of Parity for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Insurance Benefits,” a report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Public Health Services, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD. (March 1998).

48 Farrah and Associates, New England HMO Monitor ,Volume 497.0.

49 Tims, Fletcher, Hubbard, “Treatment Outcomes for Drug Abuse Clients,” Improving Drug Abuse Treatment , Monagraph Series No. 106, National Institute on Drug Abuse Research (1991). Charuvastra, Dalali, Cassuci, Ling, “Outcome Studies: Comparison of Short-Term vs. Long-Term Treatment in a Residential Community,” International Journal of Addiction (1992).

50 Ladd, “Report to the 118th Legislature on the Substance Abuse Testing Law for Calendar Year 1997”, report by the Maine Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Standards, Augusta, ME (March 1998)

51 Ibid.


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