father and child Information for Parents

Choosing child care is one of the most important decisions you will make for your child. A good child care setting can have a positive impact on the development of your child.

Maine has many different child care options to meet the various needs of families. To learn more about the options available, click on the type of care below.

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When you have found a program that meets your family's and child's needs, stay involved, ask questions, and talk with your caregiver each day about your child.

The links to the left provide information that is relevant to parents searching for or currently using child care in Maine.

Child Care Centers Facilities licensed as a child care center serve more than three children under the age of 13 and are not a place of residence. The average child care center in Maine cares for 35 children. Centers often have a more structured schedule and children are grouped according to age. Child Care Centers usually follow regular work hours and may be closed for holidays. Staff in a center must be at least 18 years of age and a Center Director must have experience and/or an educational background in Early Care and Education. Yearly minimum training requirements, including CPR and First Aid, must be maintained by staff of the center.

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Family Child Care Homes A licensed family child care provider can care for up to 8-12 children, depending on the children's ages and if there is additional help, in his or her home. The average family child care home in Maine cares for 11 children. Family Child Care Homes often have mixed age groups. Family Child Care Providers are required to take a 6 hour Getting Started in Family Child Care course offered through Regional Child Care Resource Development Centers before getting a license to care for children. Yearly minimum training requirements, including CPR and First Aid, must be maintained. If a person cares for only one or two children they are exempt from license requirements (see legal-unlicensed child care below).

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Nursery Schools offer programming to children, ages 3-7, for no more than 3 1/2 hours per day, 2-5 days a week. The preschool programming often provides a structured curriculum to an average of 10 children in a group.

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Legal-Unlicensed Child Care
Kith and Kin (family and friend) caregivers, are considered "legal-unlicensed" if they care for only one or two children in their home.

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Head Start
Head Start is a comprehensive early childhood development program for children, ages 3-5, whose family income is at or below the poverty level or who have a disability. Comprehensive services include education, health, nutrition, and social skills. Traditionally Head Start is a part-day, part-year program, operating for 3 1/2 hours to 6 hours per day for 32 weeks a year. Most Head Start programs throughout Maine now offer "wrap around services" which combines Head Start services with child care services to offer full-day, full-year programs to families. Through Home Start, Head Start programming is offered at family child care homes. Early Head Start is a family focused program for children ages 0-3 with the same eligibility requirements as Head Start. Maine offers Early Head Start services in centers and family child care homes, as well as through Home-based programming in which Head Start personnel come to the child's home to meet with the family.

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School Age Program
are typically for children between the ages of 5-12 years. This type of care can be found in a public or private school setting, as well as in recreation centers, child care centers, or family child care homes. There is usually one director and a staff of teachers, all trained in school-age care and related activities. Group sizes are determined by state regulations, and programs are licensed. Some programs run on a school calendar, while others operate year round. School-age care can be provided before school begins, in the after-school hours, and possibly on school holidays and breaks. In some cases, transportation and meals are provided as well.

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Summer Programs
Summer camps run in sessions, and can be full-day or part-day schedules. Summer camps usually serve children aged 5-15 years. Camps are licensed by the Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Health, Division of Health Engineering, and there is a director and a trained staff of counselors and assistants. Some camps specialize in certain areas, such as the arts, sports, or science. In some areas of Maine, free summer camp opportunities are available. Your Resource Development Center can provide further information.

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Public School Preschool Programs
Preschool programs that are administered by local public school systems in many areas of Maine are not regulated by this Department, but instead by the Department of Education. More information about the programs External site disclaimer.

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In-Home Care
is provided in a child's home by a personally hired caregiver, usually a nanny or au pair, or in some cases a "mother's helper". This type of care is not regulated by the state, so further information about this type of care can not be provided by this office. Your Resource Development Center does not offer referrals for this type of care.

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12-15 year old Programs
The Office of Child Care and Head Start/DHS recently funded 17 new or expanded after-school programs for 12-15 year old youth. These diverse programs are located across the state and offer unique and exciting activities for this age-group. For more information about these programs, contact our office.
List of After School Programs - Microsoft Word, or Adobe PDF (*free viewer)

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