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Home > Bugs > Bugs of Vegetables > Stink Bugs

Stink Bugs

 

Stink bugs feed on many plants, including native and ornamental trees, shrubs, vines, weeds, and many cultivated crops. They can do a lot of damage to vegetable and flower gardens. Stink bugs get their common name from the foul-smelling fluids they exude when disturbed.

 

second instar nymphs green stink bug fifth instar nymphs green stink bug green stink bug adult
Stink bugs have five nymphal stages, or instars. The nymphs are smaller than adults, but similar in shape. Green stink bug nymphs are predominantly black when small, but as they mature, they become green with orange and black markings. Adult stink bugs are shield-shaped. Green stink bugs are bright green and about 3/4 inch long. The major body regions of the green stink bug are bordered by a narrow, orange-yellow line.
third instar nymphs brown stink bug brown stink bug nymph brown stink bug adult
Stink bugs have five nymphal stages, or instars. The nymphs are smaller than adults, but similar in shape. Nymphs of the brown stink bug are light green. Adult stink bugs are shield-shaped. Brown stink bugs are dull brownish-yellow in color and about 5/8 inch long
   
   

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug—Halyomorpha halys

The Brown marmorated stink bug, a pest of fruit trees, vegetable crops, and other plants, has recently been found in the Northeast. It can be a nuisance pest in homes when it seeks overwintering sites in the autumn, often in large numbers, and tends to have a strong disagreeable odor. It is originally from Asia. It is not established in Maine.

brown marmorated stink bug life stages brown marmorated stink bug adult brown marmorated stink bugs on peach
The brown marmorated stink bug has five nymphal stages, or instars, that range in size from less than 1/8 inch to 1/2 inch in length. Young nymphs are yellowish and mottled with black and red; older nymphs more closely resemble the adults. Adults are approximately 5/8 inch long with a mottled brownish grey color. The next to last (4th) antennal segment has a white band and several of the abdominal segments protrude from beneath the wings and are alternatively banded with black and white. Feeding damage appears as small necrotic spots on leaves and fruit.
   

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Identification and Control Information (each will open in a new window)

 

[Photos, left to right: Herb Pilcher, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org; Herb Pilcher, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org; David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org; Herb Pilcher, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org; Russ Ottens, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org; Russ Ottens, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org]

 
It is the policy of the State of Maine to minimize reliance on pesticides. The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry and the Maine IPM Council encourage everyone to practice integrated pest management and to use pesticides only as a last resort. The mention of pesticides in the fact sheets linked to these pages does not imply an endorsement of any product. Be sure that any product used is currently registered and follow all label directions.